Alumni Features  




Success Scholar - Lindsay Sorin

LindsaySorinAwarded one of Seton Hall Law’s first Success Scholarships, Lindsay Sorin, 2L, developed an interest early on in the role of government and its impact on daily lives. As an undergraduate at Hamilton College, she studied political science focusing on government and economics, but it was not until she worked with then Senator Jon Corzine as a summer intern and later with the New York State Comptroller’s office that she realized she wanted to become an attorney, like her father before her.

Her father, prior to retiring and starting a new career as a college professor, had worked as a corporate and securities lawyer. As a child growing up in Marlboro, Lindsay enjoyed listening to the stories he shared about his work. She had not, however, considered becoming a lawyer herself. That is until she gained some hands-on experience and saw for herself the critical role law plays in shaping society. Working for Jon Corzine and the New York Comptroller, she says, “I saw the effect that the policymakers’ decisions had on our society, and I wanted to be a part of that.”

Not one to throw herself half heartedly into her pursuits, she excelled as a first year student at Seton Hall Law. Now in her second year, she was awarded a $20,000 Success Scholarship funded by James, ’74 and Diane, ’75, D’Agostino. The couple pledged $100,000, as part of the Seton Hall Law Rising capital campaign, to help establish the Success Scholarship program. Scholarships awarded through the program are provided to students who did not receive any scholarship support during their first year but who have demonstrated an ability to succeed in law.

In funding the scholarship, the D’Agostinos explained that they wanted to help others as they were helped in their pursuit of a legal education.

The scholarship, Lindsay says, has come both as a welcomed surprise and as another demonstration of the strength of the Seton Hall Law community. “The strength of the relationships that are apparent here is what attracted me to Seton Hall Law,” she says. “It’s such a kind gesture to help a student you’ve never even met. It’s inspiring. I hope someday to be able to pay it forward.”

Not only will the scholarship ease some of the financial burden of attending law school, it will allow her to pursue some opportunities previously out of reach. Her hope is to take part in Seton Hall Law’s study abroad program in Zanzibar studying human trafficking and modern day slavery next winter.

“It will be an opportunity to stretch my boundaries and learn about another culture and environment that is so different from mine, and when else will I have the chance to see lions and giraffes in their natural habitat. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” she explains.

Come this summer, she will be working as a summer associate at Day Pitney in Florham Park. In the meantime, she continues to work hard at her law school studies, while also serving on the SBA as a Senator, as the student representative to the Faculty Curriculum Committee, and as a member of the Law Review.

Lindsay explains that she came to law school “focused and wanting to succeed.” But more than just personal success, she believes that “part of the study of law is to determine those policies and practices that are beneficial to society.”