About Seton Hall Law

Professor Eugene Volokh  

Namesake of the preeminent law blog, The Volokh Conspiracy, is coming to Seton Hall Law on Tuesday, February 23 to discuss “The Mechanisms of the Slippery Slope.” Professor Volokh will be speaking at 11a.m.in the Faculty Library, refreshments will be served, courtesy of the Federalist Society.

Professor Eugene Volokh

Professor Eugene Volokh, namesake of the preeminent law blog, The Volokh Conspiracy, is coming to Seton Hall Law on Tuesday, February 23 to discuss “The Mechanisms of the Slippery Slope.” Professor Volokh will be speaking at 11a.m.in the Faculty Library, refreshments will be served, courtesy of the Federalist Society.

Professor Volokh is the Gary T. Schwartz Professor of Law at UCLA School of Law; he teaches free speech law, criminal law, tort law, religious freedom law, and church-state relations law at UCLA School of Law, where he has also often taught copyright law and a seminar on firearms regulation policy. Before coming to UCLA, he clerked for Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on the U.S. Supreme Court and for Judge Alex Kozinski on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Volokh is the author of the textbooks The First Amendment and Related Statutes (3d ed. 2008), The Religion Clauses and Related Statutes (2005), and Academic Legal Writing (3d ed. 2007), as well as over 60 law review articles and over 80 op-eds, listed below. He is a member of The American Law Institute, a member of the American Heritage Dictionary Usage Panel, and the founder and coauthor of The Volokh Conspiracy, a Weblog that gets over 25,000 unique visitors per weekday. Volokh is also an Academic Affiliate for the Mayer Brown LLP law firm; he generally consults on other lawyers' cases, but he has briefed and argued Ingram v. Battaglia / Rush v. Frank before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, and State v. Drahota before the Nebraska Supreme Court.

Volokh worked for 12 years as a computer programmer, and is still partner in a small software company which sells HP 3000 software that he wrote. He graduated from UCLA with a B.S. in math-computer science at age 15, and has written many articles on computer software. Volokh was born in the USSR; his family emigrated to the U.S. when he was seven years old.

Read more of Professor Volokh’s bio, articles and op-eds

Read The Volokh Conspiracy