JD Curriculum (Entering Class of 2016)   

The J.D. program can be completed in 3 academic years on a full-time basis, or 4 academic years on a part-time basis.  Our part-time program is structured as an evening division:  Students in our evening division take classes 3 to 4 nights a week, Monday through Thursday, with classes meeting between the hours of 6 and 10 p.m..  Neither the full-time nor part-time programs require summer classes, but summer classes are offered, both on-campus and through our summer study-abroad options.

 

Contact Admissions (if Prospective Student)
admitme@shu.edu | 973-642-8747

Contact Enrollment Services (if Current Student)
973-642-8502


Full-Time Curriculum

Credits Required to Graduate: 88

First Year

FALL TERM (Total Credits: 15)

Number Name Credit Type Offering

LAW6005

Contracts

The course considers the law governing consensual relationships. It analyzes the requisites of a legally-enforceable contract, including the offer-acceptance process, consideration, and requirements relating to the capacity of parties and to formalities of contract formation. Invalidating factors such as fraud, duress, mistake, and impossibility are explored. Issues of remedies are examined. Throughout the course, relevant provisions of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code regulating the sale of goods are studied.



5

Lecture

in-class

LAW6008

Torts I

This course examines the law governing compensation for civil wrongs not arising from agreement and judicial remedies for such wrongs. It includes intentional torts and privilege defenses; negligence-elements and defenses; and strict liability, including ultra-hazardous activities, and product liability. Special emphasis is given to legal theories of causation, standards of care and issues of proof.



4

Lecture

in-class

LAW6001

Civil Procedure I

This course dissects the anatomy of a civil case from complaint through pre-trial proceedings, trial and appeal. It therefore studies the organization and jurisdiction of federal and state courts, including emphasis on personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The focus is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, exploring issues of pleading, pretrial discovery and motion practice.

 



2/3

Lecture

in-class

LAW5050

Introduction to Lawyering I

The Introduction to Lawyering course is a six credit, full year, required course for all first year students.  It will introduce students to the fundamental skills employed by lawyers across various practice areas and will develop within students the habits of thoughtful, reflective, and ethical professional practice.  Students will learn the following core lawyering skills: writing, research, interviewing, fact analysis, client counseling, negotiation and oral advocacy. Through the use of simulations students will be required to step into the lawyer role, practice their skills, and make decisions that are challenging on intellectual, strategic, emotional and ethical levels.  Students will be taught how to approach legal problems by thoroughly planning, executing and then critically reflecting on the choices they make.  Faculty will provide opportunities for students to experiment with the development of their professional voices and roles, and will expose students to the deep satisfaction that can be found practicing law.  Lawyering sections will be small and students will often work collaboratively in teams on projects; thus providing a collegial intimate academic setting.



3

Skills

in-class

 

SPRING TERM (Total Credits: 15)

Number Name Credit Type Offering

HIPH7504

Professional Responsibility

This course is an introduction to the rules governing the lawyering process. It examines the legally imposed and conscience-imposed duties of members of the legal profession to clients, witnesses, opposing parties, governmental agencies and the public. It explores the economics of the legal profession and includes a detailed examination of the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility and other related standards of proper conduct. Students planning to sit for the New Jersey Bar Examination must achieve a grade of "C" or better in the Professional Responsibility course as partial fulfillment of the requirements for application for admission to practice law. Students who receive a "C-", "D" or "D+" must sit for the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) to be admitted to the New Jersey Bar.



NOTE: Students should consult with the Board of Bar Examiners in the jurisdiction where they intend to seek admission to the bar as to whether that jurisdiction requires sitting for the MPRE.

2

Lecture

in-class

LAW6014

Criminal Law

This course introduces students to the state's role in the control of deviant behavior through law. It explores theories of responsibility, punishment and reform. It considers general principles of substantive criminal law including: intent; justification and excuse; defenses; elements of particular crimes; attempt; conspiracy; and responsibility for the acts of others.



3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6016

Property

This course undertakes a basic survey of the concepts of possession and ownership of land, chattels and other forms of property. It includes the history, legal status and modes of transfer of real and personal property; estates in land -- an introduction to future interests; forms of ownership and title; the transfer of interests in land including landlord/tenant; condemnation; restrictive covenants; and equitable servitude.



5

Lecture

in-class

LAW5051

Introduction to Lawyering II

The Introduction to Lawyering course is a six credit, full year, required course for all first year students.  It will introduce students to the fundamental skills employed by lawyers across various practice areas and will develop within students the habits of thoughtful, reflective, and ethical professional practice.  Students will learn the following core lawyering skills: writing, research, interviewing, fact analysis, client counseling, negotiation and oral advocacy. Through the use of simulations students will be required to step into the lawyer role, practice their skills, and make decisions that are challenging on intellectual, strategic, emotional and ethical levels.  Students will be taught how to approach legal problems by thoroughly planning, executing and then critically reflecting on the choices they make.  Faculty will provide opportunities for students to experiment with the development of their professional voices and roles, and will expose students to the deep satisfaction that can be found practicing law.  Lawyering sections will be small and students will often work collaboratively in teams on projects; thus providing a collegial intimate academic setting.



3

Skills

in-class

LAW6002

Civil Procedure II

This course dissects the anatomy of a civil case from complaint through pre-trial proceedings, trial and appeal. It therefore studies the organization and jurisdiction of federal and state courts, including emphasis on personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The focus is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, exploring issues of pleading, pretrial discovery and motion practice.



2/3

Lecture

in-class

 

Second Year

FALL TERM (Total Credits: 15)

  1. Take Financial Concepts for Lawyers* (CORP7125) and/or Business Associations* (CORP7131) and/or Evidence (PRMD7201). *Students need to take Financial Concepts for Lawyers (CORP7125) either before or at the same time as Business Associations (CORP7131).
  2. Additional Credits = 0 - 7/8
Number Name Credit Type Offering

CORP7131

Business Associations

This course considers the organization and operation of business enterprises with particular emphasis on the corporate form. The class includes an introduction to agency and partnership and limited liability companies. Corporate issues to be discussed include: nature of the corporation; corporate formation; corporate privilege and power; special problems of close corporations; fiduciary duties of directors and controlling shareholders; rights of shareholders; use of proxy machinery; derivative suits; and liability for insider trading, including an analysis of SEC Rule 10b-5.



Second year day and evening.

4

Lecture

in-class

LAW6015

Constitutional Law

The course treats government authority under the United States Constitution. It begins with an analysis of the scope of judicial review and the development of theories of constitutional adjudication. It then treats the commerce clause and other sources of federal authority, and considers limitations on state and federal regulation of economic and property interests. It explores federalism issues of the relationship between the federal government and the states and issues of the allocation of power among the three branches of the federal government. The course also surveys the protection of the rights of the individual against state and federal government action under the United States Constitution, including freedom of speech and expression, association, religion and the right of privacy. Protections under the equal protection clause and the right to due process are explored.



5

Lecture

in-class

PRMD7201

Evidence

This course analyzes the regulation of proof in judicial proceedings. It includes: burdens of production and persuasion; judicial notice; presumptions; relevance and its counterweights; the fundamental requirements for admission of testimonial, documentary and non-testimonial evidence; the nature and function of expert testimony; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; character evidence; rules of preference; fixed rules of relevance, and rules of exclusion based on non-inferential policies. (Evidence in Practice and in Depth also satisfies the Evidence requirement).



Note: Students cannot apply both Evidence (PRMD7201) and Evidence in Practice and in Depth (PRMD7205) towards degree requirements.

3

Lecture

in-class

CORP7125

Financial Concepts for Lawyers

This course will provide law students with an introduction to accounting (balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement, financial statement analysis), the time value of money (including future value, present value, and internal rate of return), financial instruments (including debt, preferred stock, and common stock), and the basics of Excel.



Pre/co-requisite: Business Associations

1

Lecture

in-class

 

SPRING TERM (Total Credits: 15)

  1. Take  Business Associations* (CORP7131) and/or Financial Concepts for Lawyers* (CORP7125) and/or Evidence (PRMD7201). *Students need to take Financial Concepts for Lawyers (CORP7125) either before or at the same time as Business Associations (CORP7131).
  2. additional credits = 7/8-11/12
Number Name Credit Type Offering

CORP7131

Business Associations

This course considers the organization and operation of business enterprises with particular emphasis on the corporate form. The class includes an introduction to agency and partnership and limited liability companies. Corporate issues to be discussed include: nature of the corporation; corporate formation; corporate privilege and power; special problems of close corporations; fiduciary duties of directors and controlling shareholders; rights of shareholders; use of proxy machinery; derivative suits; and liability for insider trading, including an analysis of SEC Rule 10b-5.



Second year day and evening.

4

Lecture

in-class

PRMD7201

Evidence

This course analyzes the regulation of proof in judicial proceedings. It includes: burdens of production and persuasion; judicial notice; presumptions; relevance and its counterweights; the fundamental requirements for admission of testimonial, documentary and non-testimonial evidence; the nature and function of expert testimony; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; character evidence; rules of preference; fixed rules of relevance, and rules of exclusion based on non-inferential policies. (Evidence in Practice and in Depth also satisfies the Evidence requirement).



Note: Students cannot apply both Evidence (PRMD7201) and Evidence in Practice and in Depth (PRMD7205) towards degree requirements.

3

Lecture

in-class

CORP7125

Financial Concepts for Lawyers

This course will provide law students with an introduction to accounting (balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement, financial statement analysis), the time value of money (including future value, present value, and internal rate of return), financial instruments (including debt, preferred stock, and common stock), and the basics of Excel.



Pre/co-requisite: Business Associations

1

Lecture

in-class

 

Third Year

FALL/SPRING TERMS (Total Credits: 24-32)

CREDITS REQUIRED TO GRADUATE: 88

  1. Note 1: Appellate Advocacy can be taken at any time after first year and before the student's final year. Appellate Advocacy is a pre or co-requisite for students who compete in the Eugene Gressman Moot Court Competition or any interscholastic moot court competition.
  2. Note 2: Persuasion and Advocacy can be taken at any time after spring semester of first year.
  3. Note 3: Advanced Writing Requirement (AWR) can be taken any time after the second year after Appellate Advocacy and (ideally) prior to the final semester.
  4. Note 4: For students who are members of journals, their comment generally satisfies the AWR requirement.
  5. Note 5: Both Persuasion and Advocacy and Professional Responsibility are prerequisites for participation in clinics in a student's final year.

In addition to the above, students must satisfy the Law School's Residency Requirements.


Part-Time Evening Curriculum

Credits Required to Graduate: 88

First Year

FALL TERM (Total Credits: 10)

Number Name Credit Type Offering

LAW6006

Contracts I

The course considers the law governing consensual relationships. It analyzes the requisites of a legally-enforceable contract, including the offer-acceptance process, consideration, and requirements relating to the capacity of parties and to formalities of contract formation. Invalidating factors such as fraud, duress, mistake, and impossibility are explored. Issues of remedies are examined. Throughout the course, relevant provisions of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code regulating the sale of goods are studied.



3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6001

Civil Procedure I

This course dissects the anatomy of a civil case from complaint through pre-trial proceedings, trial and appeal. It therefore studies the organization and jurisdiction of federal and state courts, including emphasis on personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The focus is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, exploring issues of pleading, pretrial discovery and motion practice.

 



2/3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6010

Property I

This course undertakes a basic survey of the concepts of possession and ownership of land, chattels and other forms of property. It includes the history, legal status and modes of transfer of real and personal property; estates in land -- an introduction to future interests; forms of ownership and title; the transfer of interests in land including landlord/tenant; condemnation; restrictive covenants; and equitable servitude.



2

Lecture

in-class

LAW5050

Introduction to Lawyering I

The Introduction to Lawyering course is a six credit, full year, required course for all first year students.  It will introduce students to the fundamental skills employed by lawyers across various practice areas and will develop within students the habits of thoughtful, reflective, and ethical professional practice.  Students will learn the following core lawyering skills: writing, research, interviewing, fact analysis, client counseling, negotiation and oral advocacy. Through the use of simulations students will be required to step into the lawyer role, practice their skills, and make decisions that are challenging on intellectual, strategic, emotional and ethical levels.  Students will be taught how to approach legal problems by thoroughly planning, executing and then critically reflecting on the choices they make.  Faculty will provide opportunities for students to experiment with the development of their professional voices and roles, and will expose students to the deep satisfaction that can be found practicing law.  Lawyering sections will be small and students will often work collaboratively in teams on projects; thus providing a collegial intimate academic setting.



3

Skills

in-class

 

SPRING TERM (Total Credits: 11)

Number Name Credit Type Offering

LAW6007

Contracts II

The course considers the law governing consensual relationships. It analyzes the requisites of a legally-enforceable contract, including the offer-acceptance process, consideration, and requirements relating to the capacity of parties and to formalities of contract formation. Invalidating factors such as fraud, duress, mistake, and impossibility are explored. Issues of remedies are examined. Throughout the course, relevant provisions of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code regulating the sale of goods are studied.



3

Lecture

in-class

LAW5051

Introduction to Lawyering II

The Introduction to Lawyering course is a six credit, full year, required course for all first year students.  It will introduce students to the fundamental skills employed by lawyers across various practice areas and will develop within students the habits of thoughtful, reflective, and ethical professional practice.  Students will learn the following core lawyering skills: writing, research, interviewing, fact analysis, client counseling, negotiation and oral advocacy. Through the use of simulations students will be required to step into the lawyer role, practice their skills, and make decisions that are challenging on intellectual, strategic, emotional and ethical levels.  Students will be taught how to approach legal problems by thoroughly planning, executing and then critically reflecting on the choices they make.  Faculty will provide opportunities for students to experiment with the development of their professional voices and roles, and will expose students to the deep satisfaction that can be found practicing law.  Lawyering sections will be small and students will often work collaboratively in teams on projects; thus providing a collegial intimate academic setting.



3

Skills

in-class

LAW6002

Civil Procedure II

This course dissects the anatomy of a civil case from complaint through pre-trial proceedings, trial and appeal. It therefore studies the organization and jurisdiction of federal and state courts, including emphasis on personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The focus is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, exploring issues of pleading, pretrial discovery and motion practice.



2/3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6011

Property II

This course undertakes a basic survey of the concepts of possession and ownership of land, chattels and other forms of property. It includes the history, legal status and modes of transfer of real and personal property; estates in land -- an introduction to future interests; forms of ownership and title; the transfer of interests in land including landlord/tenant; condemnation; restrictive covenants; and equitable servitude.



2

Lecture

in-class

 

Second Year

FALL TERM (Total Credits: 9 - 11)

  1. Additional Credits = 1 - 2
Number Name Credit Type Offering

LAW6012

Constitutional Law I

The course treats government authority under the United States Constitution. It begins with an analysis of the scope of judicial review and the development of theories of constitutional adjudication. It then treats the commerce clause and other sources of federal authority, and considers limitations on state and federal regulation of economic and property interests. It explores federalism issues of the relationship between the federal government and the states and issues of the allocation of power among the three branches of the federal government.



2

Lecture

in-class

LAW6008

Torts I

This course examines the law governing compensation for civil wrongs not arising from agreement and judicial remedies for such wrongs. It includes intentional torts and privilege defenses; negligence-elements and defenses; and strict liability, including ultra-hazardous activities, and product liability. Special emphasis is given to legal theories of causation, standards of care and issues of proof.



4

Lecture

in-class

LAW6014

Criminal Law

This course introduces students to the state's role in the control of deviant behavior through law. It explores theories of responsibility, punishment and reform. It considers general principles of substantive criminal law including: intent; justification and excuse; defenses; elements of particular crimes; attempt; conspiracy; and responsibility for the acts of others.



3

Lecture

in-class

 

SPRING TERM (Total Credits: 8 - 11)

  1. Additional Credits = 1 - 3
Number Name Credit Type Offering

HIPH7504

Professional Responsibility

This course is an introduction to the rules governing the lawyering process. It examines the legally imposed and conscience-imposed duties of members of the legal profession to clients, witnesses, opposing parties, governmental agencies and the public. It explores the economics of the legal profession and includes a detailed examination of the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility and other related standards of proper conduct. Students planning to sit for the New Jersey Bar Examination must achieve a grade of "C" or better in the Professional Responsibility course as partial fulfillment of the requirements for application for admission to practice law. Students who receive a "C-", "D" or "D+" must sit for the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) to be admitted to the New Jersey Bar.



NOTE: Students should consult with the Board of Bar Examiners in the jurisdiction where they intend to seek admission to the bar as to whether that jurisdiction requires sitting for the MPRE.

2

Lecture

in-class

PRMD7201

Evidence

This course analyzes the regulation of proof in judicial proceedings. It includes: burdens of production and persuasion; judicial notice; presumptions; relevance and its counterweights; the fundamental requirements for admission of testimonial, documentary and non-testimonial evidence; the nature and function of expert testimony; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; character evidence; rules of preference; fixed rules of relevance, and rules of exclusion based on non-inferential policies. (Evidence in Practice and in Depth also satisfies the Evidence requirement).



Note: Students cannot apply both Evidence (PRMD7201) and Evidence in Practice and in Depth (PRMD7205) towards degree requirements.

3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6013

Constitutional Law II

The course surveys the protection of the rights of the individual against state and federal government action under the United States Constitution, including freedom of speech and expression, association, religion and the right of privacy. Protections under the equal protection clause and the right to due process are explored.



3

Lecture

in-class

 

Third Year

FALL TERM (Total Credits: 8 - 11)

  1. Additional Credits = 2 - 6
Number Name Credit Type Offering

CORP7131

Business Associations

This course considers the organization and operation of business enterprises with particular emphasis on the corporate form. The class includes an introduction to agency and partnership and limited liability companies. Corporate issues to be discussed include: nature of the corporation; corporate formation; corporate privilege and power; special problems of close corporations; fiduciary duties of directors and controlling shareholders; rights of shareholders; use of proxy machinery; derivative suits; and liability for insider trading, including an analysis of SEC Rule 10b-5.



Second year day and evening.

4

Lecture

in-class

CORP7125

Financial Concepts for Lawyers

This course will provide law students with an introduction to accounting (balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement, financial statement analysis), the time value of money (including future value, present value, and internal rate of return), financial instruments (including debt, preferred stock, and common stock), and the basics of Excel.



Pre/co-requisite: Business Associations

1

Lecture

in-class

 

SPRING TERM (Total Credits: 8 - 11)

  1. Additional Credits = 8 - 11

Fourth Year

FALL / SPRING TERMS (Total Credits: 16 - 23)

  1. Additional Credits = 16 - 23

 

CREDITS REQUIRED TO GRADUATE: 88

  1. Note 1: Appellate Advocacy can be taken at any time after first year and before the student's final year. Appellate Advocacy is a pre or co-requisite for students who compete in the Eugene Gressman Moot Court Competition or any interscholastic moot court competition.
  2. Note 2: Persuasion and Advocacy can be taken at any time after spring semester of first year.
  3. Note 3: Advanced Writing Requirement (AWR) can be taken any time after the second year after Appellate Advocacy and (ideally) prior to the final semester.
  4. Note 4: For students who are members of journals, their comment generally satisfies the AWR requirement.
  5. Note 5: Both Persuasion and Advocacy and Professional Responsibility are prerequisites for participation in clinics in a student's final year.

In addition to the above, students must satisfy the Law School's Residency Requirements.


Part-Time Day Curriculum

Credits Required to Graduate: 88

First Year

FALL TERM (Total Credits: 11)

Number Name Credit Type Offering

LAW6005

Contracts

The course considers the law governing consensual relationships. It analyzes the requisites of a legally-enforceable contract, including the offer-acceptance process, consideration, and requirements relating to the capacity of parties and to formalities of contract formation. Invalidating factors such as fraud, duress, mistake, and impossibility are explored. Issues of remedies are examined. Throughout the course, relevant provisions of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code regulating the sale of goods are studied.



5

Lecture

in-class

LAW6001

Civil Procedure I

This course dissects the anatomy of a civil case from complaint through pre-trial proceedings, trial and appeal. It therefore studies the organization and jurisdiction of federal and state courts, including emphasis on personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The focus is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, exploring issues of pleading, pretrial discovery and motion practice.

 



2/3

Lecture

in-class

LAW5050

Introduction to Lawyering I

The Introduction to Lawyering course is a six credit, full year, required course for all first year students.  It will introduce students to the fundamental skills employed by lawyers across various practice areas and will develop within students the habits of thoughtful, reflective, and ethical professional practice.  Students will learn the following core lawyering skills: writing, research, interviewing, fact analysis, client counseling, negotiation and oral advocacy. Through the use of simulations students will be required to step into the lawyer role, practice their skills, and make decisions that are challenging on intellectual, strategic, emotional and ethical levels.  Students will be taught how to approach legal problems by thoroughly planning, executing and then critically reflecting on the choices they make.  Faculty will provide opportunities for students to experiment with the development of their professional voices and roles, and will expose students to the deep satisfaction that can be found practicing law.  Lawyering sections will be small and students will often work collaboratively in teams on projects; thus providing a collegial intimate academic setting.



3

Skills

in-class

 

SPRING TERM (Total Credits: 10)

Number Name Credit Type Offering

LAW6002

Civil Procedure II

This course dissects the anatomy of a civil case from complaint through pre-trial proceedings, trial and appeal. It therefore studies the organization and jurisdiction of federal and state courts, including emphasis on personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The focus is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, exploring issues of pleading, pretrial discovery and motion practice.



2/3

Lecture

in-class

LAW5051

Introduction to Lawyering II

The Introduction to Lawyering course is a six credit, full year, required course for all first year students.  It will introduce students to the fundamental skills employed by lawyers across various practice areas and will develop within students the habits of thoughtful, reflective, and ethical professional practice.  Students will learn the following core lawyering skills: writing, research, interviewing, fact analysis, client counseling, negotiation and oral advocacy. Through the use of simulations students will be required to step into the lawyer role, practice their skills, and make decisions that are challenging on intellectual, strategic, emotional and ethical levels.  Students will be taught how to approach legal problems by thoroughly planning, executing and then critically reflecting on the choices they make.  Faculty will provide opportunities for students to experiment with the development of their professional voices and roles, and will expose students to the deep satisfaction that can be found practicing law.  Lawyering sections will be small and students will often work collaboratively in teams on projects; thus providing a collegial intimate academic setting.



3

Skills

in-class

LAW6016

Property

This course undertakes a basic survey of the concepts of possession and ownership of land, chattels and other forms of property. It includes the history, legal status and modes of transfer of real and personal property; estates in land -- an introduction to future interests; forms of ownership and title; the transfer of interests in land including landlord/tenant; condemnation; restrictive covenants; and equitable servitude.



5

Lecture

in-class

 

Second Year

FALL TERM (Total Credits: 12)

Number Name Credit Type Offering

LAW6015

Constitutional Law

The course treats government authority under the United States Constitution. It begins with an analysis of the scope of judicial review and the development of theories of constitutional adjudication. It then treats the commerce clause and other sources of federal authority, and considers limitations on state and federal regulation of economic and property interests. It explores federalism issues of the relationship between the federal government and the states and issues of the allocation of power among the three branches of the federal government. The course also surveys the protection of the rights of the individual against state and federal government action under the United States Constitution, including freedom of speech and expression, association, religion and the right of privacy. Protections under the equal protection clause and the right to due process are explored.



5

Lecture

in-class

PRMD7201

Evidence

This course analyzes the regulation of proof in judicial proceedings. It includes: burdens of production and persuasion; judicial notice; presumptions; relevance and its counterweights; the fundamental requirements for admission of testimonial, documentary and non-testimonial evidence; the nature and function of expert testimony; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; character evidence; rules of preference; fixed rules of relevance, and rules of exclusion based on non-inferential policies. (Evidence in Practice and in Depth also satisfies the Evidence requirement).



Note: Students cannot apply both Evidence (PRMD7201) and Evidence in Practice and in Depth (PRMD7205) towards degree requirements.

3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6008

Torts I

This course examines the law governing compensation for civil wrongs not arising from agreement and judicial remedies for such wrongs. It includes intentional torts and privilege defenses; negligence-elements and defenses; and strict liability, including ultra-hazardous activities, and product liability. Special emphasis is given to legal theories of causation, standards of care and issues of proof.



4

Lecture

in-class

 

SPRING TERM (Total Credits: 12)

  1. Take Business Associations* (CORP7131) and/or Financial Concepts for Lawyers* (CORP7125). *Students need to take Financial Concepts for Lawyers (CORP7125) either before or at the same time as Business Associations (CORP7131).
Number Name Credit Type Offering

CORP7131

Business Associations

This course considers the organization and operation of business enterprises with particular emphasis on the corporate form. The class includes an introduction to agency and partnership and limited liability companies. Corporate issues to be discussed include: nature of the corporation; corporate formation; corporate privilege and power; special problems of close corporations; fiduciary duties of directors and controlling shareholders; rights of shareholders; use of proxy machinery; derivative suits; and liability for insider trading, including an analysis of SEC Rule 10b-5.



Second year day and evening.

4

Lecture

in-class

LAW6014

Criminal Law

This course introduces students to the state's role in the control of deviant behavior through law. It explores theories of responsibility, punishment and reform. It considers general principles of substantive criminal law including: intent; justification and excuse; defenses; elements of particular crimes; attempt; conspiracy; and responsibility for the acts of others.



3

Lecture

in-class

CORP7125

Financial Concepts for Lawyers

This course will provide law students with an introduction to accounting (balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement, financial statement analysis), the time value of money (including future value, present value, and internal rate of return), financial instruments (including debt, preferred stock, and common stock), and the basics of Excel.



Pre/co-requisite: Business Associations

1

Lecture

in-class

HIPH7504

Professional Responsibility

This course is an introduction to the rules governing the lawyering process. It examines the legally imposed and conscience-imposed duties of members of the legal profession to clients, witnesses, opposing parties, governmental agencies and the public. It explores the economics of the legal profession and includes a detailed examination of the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility and other related standards of proper conduct. Students planning to sit for the New Jersey Bar Examination must achieve a grade of "C" or better in the Professional Responsibility course as partial fulfillment of the requirements for application for admission to practice law. Students who receive a "C-", "D" or "D+" must sit for the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) to be admitted to the New Jersey Bar.



NOTE: Students should consult with the Board of Bar Examiners in the jurisdiction where they intend to seek admission to the bar as to whether that jurisdiction requires sitting for the MPRE.

2

Lecture

in-class

 

Third/Fourth Years

FALL/SPRING TERMS (Total Credits: 43)

  1. Additional Credits = 43

If converting to full-time day please consult the Full-Time Day Curriculum for below sequencing.

CREDITS REQUIRED TO GRADUATE: 88

  1. Note 1: Appellate Advocacy can be taken at any time after first year and before the student's final year. Appellate Advocacy is a pre or co-requisite for students who compete in the Eugene Gressman Moot Court Competition or any interscholastic moot court competition.
  2. Note 2: Persuasion and Advocacy can be taken at any time after spring semester of first year.
  3. Note 3: Advanced Writing Requirement (AWR) can be taken any time after the second year after Appellate Advocacy and (ideally) prior to the final semester.
  4. Note 4: For students who are members of journals, their comment generally satisfies the AWR requirement.
  5. Note 5: Both Persuasion and Advocacy and Professional Responsibility are prerequisites for participation in clinics in a student's final year.

In addition to the above, students must satisfy the Law School's Residency Requirements.