JD Courses (List by Course Name)   

 

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Number Name Credit Type Offering

HLTH7509

Accountable Care Organizations

The course uses an emerging health delivery and finance model to connect basic health law principles to a very practical setting.  Through health courses and otherwise, health students are exposed to the doctrine that many practicing lawyers have to apply on an everyday basis as they set up, contract with, and regulate ACOs.  These areas include antitrust, fraud and abuse regulation (civil and criminal), corporate, nonprofit tax, privacy, and malpractice/tort. Students will also work with health finance and insurance principles, and public policy principles driving the redirection of health delivery and finance.  The course will address several models of ACO, including Medicare ACOs, Medicaid ACOs, and private market ACOs. 



2

Lecture

in-class

CORP7130

Accounting for Lawyers

This course surveys elementary techniques and basic theoretical concepts of accounting for law students with little or no accounting background. It provides an introduction to: accounting statements and statement analysis; the accounting cycle; fixed asset accounting and depreciation; and corporate and estate accounting.

Note: Students who have completed 4 or more credits of undergraduate or graduate accounting are ineligible to enroll in the course without written permission of the Associate Dean.



2

Lecture

in-class

PUBG7801

Administrative Law

This course studies the theory of administrative actions; administrative process; agency organization; determination and promulgation of the administrative regulations; right to notice and hearing; enforcement; judicial review; standing; and the Administrative Procedure Act.



3

Lecture

in-class

PRFM9002

Adoption Law

This course provides an in-depth examination of adoption law and policy. Private and public adoption systems will be examined with special emphasis on termination of parental rights and the rights of fathers. Emerging issues such as transracial placements, wrongful adoption and open adoption records will be discussed along with the relationship of new reproductive issues to adoption.



2

Lecture

in-class

PRMD9218

Advanced Civil Practice

From client interview to verdict, this interactive skills course will prepare students for the reality of civil practice. Building on Persuasion & Advocacy (which is a pre-requisite) the course will teach the skills involved in filing and litigating a civil case. Discovery, depositions, and dispositive motions will be addressed along with trial issues and even a few post trial motions.

Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.



Prerequisites: Persuasion and Advocacy, Evidence or Evidence: Theory and Practice Note: Students cannot apply both Advanced Civil Practice (PRMD9218) course and Advanced Criminal Practice (PRMD9219) towards degree requirements.

2

Skills

in-class

PRMD9220

Advanced Civil Practice: The Simulated Law Firm

Building on Persuasion and Advocacy (which is a prerequisite) the course will teach a wide range of litigation skills utilizing a simulated law firm model.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.

Note: Students can only apply either Advanced Civil Practice (PRMD9218), Advanced Criminal Practice (PRMD9219) or Advanced Civil Practice: The Simulated Law Firm (PRMD9220) towards degree requirements.

2

Skills

in-class

PRMD9219

Advanced Criminal Practice

This interactive skills course will prepare students for the reality of criminal practice. Building on Persuasion & Advocacy (which is a prerequisite), the course will teach the skills involved in prosecuting and defending a criminal case. Topics covered will include planning and investigation of a criminal case, development of theories and themes, jury voir dire and selection, witness examination techniques, use of informants, preparation of jury charges, and post-trial motions.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail. Prerequisites: Persuasion and Advocacy, Evidence or Evidence: Theory and Practice.

Note: Students cannot apply both Advanced Criminal Practice (PRMD9219) and Advanced Civil Practice (PRMD9218) towards degree requirements.

2

Skills

in-class

INDL9314

Advanced Entertainment Law

This seminar involves an in-depth look at certain areas of the entertainment and media industry introduced in the survey course such as television, music licensing and publishing as well as an in-depth look at areas not dealt with in the survey course, such as independent film production, news gathering, advertising, video games, character licensing, and gambling. Assigned reading, class discussion and presentations by various specialists will be used to explore current legal issues, legislation and litigation.



Prerequisite: Entertainment Law.

3

Seminar

in-class

PRMD9270

Advanced Legal Research

This course is for students that would like to advance and practice their research skills. This course will review how to develop a research plan and how to evaluate legal research sources and use them effectively. Several major areas of legal research will be covered in this course, including, but not limited to: advanced internet research, cases, statutes, legislative history, administrative law, secondary sources, and research techniques and strategies. In addition to homework assignments, students will be assigned in-class exercises, and an extended research project.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail. Prerequisite: Legal Research and Writing I & II.

2

Skills

in-class

PRMD9226

Advanced Negotiation Skills

This skills course combines a theoretical and practical approach to the role of the lawyer as negotiator. It examines the types of negotiation, the role of the lawyer as negotiator, the ethics of negotiation, and the structure of negotiation (including negotiation techniques, planning for negotiation, etc.). The course utilizes simulated negotiations, both bilateral and multilateral, with evaluation and critical analysis by other students and faculty.

Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.



Note: Students can only apply either Advanced Negotiation Skills (PRMD9226), Negotiation Skills in Civil Litigation (PRMD9234) and Negotiation Skills in Transactional Lawyering (PRMD9233) towards degree requirements.

2

Skills

in-class

INTL9609

Advanced Topics in International Law

This is an AWR course that builds on the concepts in Transnational Law and International Law. Accordingly, students must have taken (or be taking simultaneously) Transnational Law or International Law, with priority given to students who have taken, or are taking, International Law. The course will concentrate on developing AWR-quality papers on topics involving international, comparative, and foreign law. Professors Boon and Lewis will work with students to identify topics followed by researching, writing, and revising papers. We will workshop draft student papers as well as articles by Professors Boon and Lewis.
This is a one-credit writing course and, therefore, we will not use the full two-hour class block every week. Students should reserve this time, however, because we will use it for full-class, small group, and one-on-one meetings.

 

 



Pre/co-requisites: International Law or Transnational Law

1

Seminar

in-class

PRMD9221

Advocacy 101: The Lawyer as Problem Solver

The course will teach students to approach their work as lawyers with the purposive perspective of a true advocate who sees his or her role as that of a problem solver. This entails developing an advocate’s mindset from the very outset, structuring one's practice with a clear focus on identifying, shaping, and achieving the client’s goals, and remaining true to that approach every day he or she is engaged in the practice of law -- so true that it informs every step the lawyer takes, not only in direct dealings with clients but also in relationships with law firm colleagues, adversaries in litigation, outside professionals or experts with whom the lawyer interacts, and the court. The course will feature readings and lectures that drive home the importance of a purposive approach to the practice of law and a semester-long project of applying the true advocate's approach to solving a particular client’s problem, from the initial interview to the ultimate resolution of the case.

The course is letter graded.



2

Skills

in-class

HLTH9521

Anatomy of a Medical Malpractice Case

This seminar provides students with the tools to prepare and try a medical malpractice case. Students are provided with three redacted (but otherwise complete) medical charts to analyze. They then conduct medical research, and learn how to locate expert witnesses. Following this each participant prepares pleadings and serves and responds to discovery requests. Students take simulated depositions of parties and experts. They prepare pretrial motions, and attend portions of an on-going medical malpractice trial, a trial call, and motion days. The grade is based on demonstrated competence in preparation of pleadings, discovery documents, motions, and taking depositions.



2

Lecture

in-class

PUBR9180

Animal Law

This seminar explores a series of topics within the general subject of "animal law".  It examines the extent to which legal systems, litigation, and cultural values impact the ways in which judges, lawyers, legislators, administrators, and laypersons view and treat animals (other than humans).  It not only covers substantive law, but also the background of claims made explicitly or implicitly in law and decisions affecting nonhuman animals.



3

Seminar

in-class

PUBG8801

Antitrust

This course studies legal protection of the competitive system under the Sherman Act, Clayton Act, Federal Trade Commission Act and related legislation. It considers problems relating to monopoly power; "horizontal" restraints on competition such as price fixing and concerted refusals to deal; "vertical" restraints such as resale price maintenance, tying and exclusive dealing arrangements; and limitations on permissible mergers and joint ventures. It explores economic as well as legal implications of federal government regulation of corporations.



NOTE: Students cannot apply both Antitrust (PUBG8801) and Health Care Antitrust (HLTH9513) towards degree requirements.

2

Lecture

in-class

MTCT7151

Appellate Advocacy

This course functions as an advanced legal writing course focusing on the development of legal research, persuasive writing and oral advocacy skills in a simulated appellate process. Each student will prepare a draft and final brief on a current issue in the law. Students then participate in two rounds of oral argument, first arguing before a panel of student judges and later arguing before a panel of attorneys.



2

Lecture

in-class

MTCT8150

Appellate Advocacy Moot Court Board

The Appellate Moot Court Board is comprised of third-year day students and fourth-year evening students who create problems to be used in the Appellate Advocacy course, supervise the work of Appellate Advocacy students under the direction of the faculty advisors, and assist in the administration of the required Appellate Advocacy course and optional Appellate Moot Court Competition. Two student directors, one in the Fall and one in the Spring, direct the board members in the completion of their administrative duties. The board members receive two credits after completion of the spring semester. Course is graded Pass/D or Fail basis.



1

Writing

in-class

MTCT8152

Appellate Advocacy Moot Court Board

The Appellate Moot Court Board is comprised of third-year day students and fourth-year evening students who create problems to be used in the Appellate Advocacy course, supervise the work of Appellate Advocacy students under the direction of the faculty advisors, and assist in the administration of the required Appellate Advocacy course and optional Appellate Moot Court Competition. Two student directors, one in the Fall and one in the Spring, direct the board members in the completion of their administrative duties. The board members receive two credits after completion of the spring semester. Course is graded Pass/D or Fail basis.



2

Writing

in-class

MTCT8153

Appellate Advocacy Moot Court Board

The Appellate Moot Court Board is comprised of third-year day students and fourth-year evening students who create problems to be used in the Appellate Advocacy course, supervise the work of Appellate Advocacy students under the direction of the faculty advisors, and assist in the administration of the required Appellate Advocacy course and optional Appellate Moot Court Competition. Two student directors, one in the Fall and one in the Spring, direct the board members in the completion of their administrative duties. The board members receive two credits after completion of the spring semester. Course is graded Pass/D or Fail basis.



2

Writing

in-class

PRMD8250

Applied Analytical Skills

This course will address the analytical, information-retrieval and reading comprehension skills necessary for success on the Bar exam.  To reinforce these critical skills, the course will focus substantively on the most heavily tested legal rules in three multistate Bar-exam subjects.  Students will learn how each topic has been tested on the MBE, MEE and the essay portion of the New Jersey Bar exam.  The course will include both weekly in-class sessions and on-line assignments designed to sharpen students’ skills and test-taking strategies.  At the end of the course, students will take a final exam containing both multiple-choice and essay questions that mirror what students will confront on the Bar exam.  Enrollment is limited to students entering their final year of law school, with priority given to those entering their final semester. 



Course is graded Pass or Fail. Note:  Course does not count towards the 15 credit limit on Legal Practice and Self-Directed Work Credits. 

2

Lecture

in-class

PUBG8802

Aviation Law

This course analyzes major areas of substantive law related to aviation and aviation litigation. It studies the Federal Aviation Act; liability of airlines and aircraft manufacturers; liability of owners and operators of private aircraft, airport owners and the federal government; liability under international treaties such as the Warsaw Convention; jurisdiction, venue and choice of law problems; economic regulation of domestic and international airlines; problems of aircraft noise; and aircraft hijacking.



2

Lecture

in-class

COML8130

Bankruptcy and Creditors' Rights

This course provides a survey of remedies available to consumer and business debtors and their creditors under state law and the United States Bankruptcy Code. The course covers topics such as: enforcement of money judgments, commencement of bankruptcy cases, the automatic stay, property of the bankruptcy estate, exemptions, secured and unsecured claims, avoidance of transfers, executory contracts, distribution of property, dismissal and conversion of bankruptcy cases, and discharge of debts in bankruptcy.



4

Lecture

in-class

HLTH9513

Birth, Death and the Law

New technologies expand our options surrounding both the beginning and end of life.  New reproductive technologies give those who want to procreate more options than ever before, while advances in medical technologies can sustain and prolong life for the sick and dying. This seminar will examine the law and ethical problems that involve use of these technologies. Topics covered will include: egg and sperm donation, trait selection through use of reproductive technology, postmortem reproduction, patient demands for futile treatment, physician assisted suicide and organ transplants.



Note: Students cannot apply both Birth, Death and the Law (HLTH9513) and The Law of Death and Dying (HLTH9509) towards degree requirements.

3

Seminar

in-class

CORP7131

Business Associations

This course considers the organization and operation of business enterprises with particular emphasis on the corporate form. The class includes an introduction to agency and partnership and limited liability companies. Corporate issues to be discussed include: nature of the corporation; corporate formation; corporate privilege and power; special problems of close corporations; fiduciary duties of directors and controlling shareholders; rights of shareholders; use of proxy machinery; derivative suits; and liability for insider trading, including an analysis of SEC Rule 10b-5.



Second year day and evening.

4

Lecture

in-class

CORP8133

Business Planning

This course analyzes basic issues to be considered in the organization, operation and disposition of business ventures, combining concepts of partnership, limited liability company and corporate law, finance, securities law and taxation. The course will focus on four primary areas: formation and capitalization of the enterprise, determining participation in profit and loss, rewarding employees and service providers and exit strategies, including business combinations and taxable and tax-free dispositions.In addition to traditional teaching methods, the course involves guest lectures from entrepreneurs, investors and others involved in the field. Significant emphasis will be placed on federal and state tax issues affecting business planning decisions. Fundamental principles of entity-level and pass-through taxation will be discussed. 



3

Lecture

in-class

HIPH9513

Catholic Social Doctrine

As lawyers and as humans, we are all faced with two great questions: What does it mean to be human? And what makes for a just society in which humans can develop their full potential? Over the past century the Popes have published a large number of documents (mostly encyclicals) that attempt to answer those questions in the light of Christ's teachings and of natural law philosophy. They have explored a wide range of issues from the broadest questions of what rights derive from being human and what constitutes human flourishing to much more specific questions about the right to private property, the principles that should govern economic life, the role of work in human life and society, just wages, and international relations. The current Pope, John Paul II, has expanded and developed the thought of his predecessors adding to it many elements drawn from his own "personalist" philosophy. The ideas set forth in catholic social teaching have their ultimate roots in Christ's teaching and in the Christian tradition as it has developed over the past two thousand years. They are not, however, strictly speaking religious ideas. Rather, they constitute a largely philosophical answer to the most basic questions which underlie the law. As such, their interest and appeal is not limited to Catholics or even to Christians. In this seminar, we will read some of the major documents and discuss their implications for the legal order.



3

Seminar

in-class

PRFM7002

Children, Family and the State

This course examines the relationship between the state, parents, and children, and how the state creates, regulates, and terminates familial relationships. It analyzes the balance between parents' rights to make childrearing decisions and the state's responsibility to protect children. The course also explores the state's treatment of minors in various contexts, including contracts, health care, and education.



2

Lecture

in-class

JRNL7163

Circuit Review

The Seton Hall Circuit Review is a student-run scholarly journal that was founded on the recognition that while thousands of cases are appealed to the federal courts of appeals, only a handful are ever reviewed by the Supreme Court of the United States. This deferral leaves tremendous power in the hands of circuit judges. For practitioners, the courts of appeals provide binding law, and until the Supreme Court speaks, a practitioner's respective court of appeals is the supreme arbiter of the law for that circuit.

Based on this, premise the Circuit Review aims to publish scholarly articles and student comments that analyze recent important developments in all areas of the law at the federal appellate level. Members of the Circuit Review are expected to write a comment that addresses a novel topic within the journal's scholarly focus, as well as participate in all facets of the publication process.

New members are chosen by the current Editorial Board upon, at the end of the first year of law school, and based on a journal write-on competition. The Editorial Board is chosen by election of the entire Circuit Review membership.

Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive credit for the Circuit Review, a student must first complete a comment for the Journal.



1

Journal

in-class

JRNL7162

Circuit Review

The Seton Hall Circuit Review is a student-run scholarly journal that was founded on the recognition that while thousands of cases are appealed to the federal courts of appeals, only a handful are ever reviewed by the Supreme Court of the United States. This deferral leaves tremendous power in the hands of circuit judges. For practitioners, the courts of appeals provide binding law, and until the Supreme Court speaks, a practitioner's respective court of appeals is the supreme arbiter of the law for that circuit.

Based on this, premise the Circuit Review aims to publish scholarly articles and student comments that analyze recent important developments in all areas of the law at the federal appellate level. Members of the Circuit Review are expected to write a comment that addresses a novel topic within the journal's scholarly focus, as well as participate in all facets of the publication process.

New members are chosen by the current Editorial Board upon, at the end of the first year of law school, and based on a journal write-on competition. The Editorial Board is chosen by election of the entire Circuit Review membership.

Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive credit for the Circuit Review, a student must first complete a comment for the Journal.



0

Journal

in-class

JRNL7164

Circuit Review

The Seton Hall Circuit Review is a student-run scholarly journal that was founded on the recognition that while thousands of cases are appealed to the federal courts of appeals, only a handful are ever reviewed by the Supreme Court of the United States. This deferral leaves tremendous power in the hands of circuit judges. For practitioners, the courts of appeals provide binding law, and until the Supreme Court speaks, a practitioner's respective court of appeals is the supreme arbiter of the law for that circuit.

Based on this, premise the Circuit Review aims to publish scholarly articles and student comments that analyze recent important developments in all areas of the law at the federal appellate level. Members of the Circuit Review are expected to write a comment that addresses a novel topic within the journal's scholarly focus, as well as participate in all facets of the publication process.

New members are chosen by the current Editorial Board upon, at the end of the first year of law school, and based on a journal write-on competition. The Editorial Board is chosen by election of the entire Circuit Review membership.

Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive credit for the Circuit Review, a student must first complete a comment for the Journal.



1

Journal

in-class

JRNL7166

Circuit Review

The Seton Hall Circuit Review is a student-run scholarly journal that was founded on the recognition that while thousands of cases are appealed to the federal courts of appeals, only a handful are ever reviewed by the Supreme Court of the United States. This deferral leaves tremendous power in the hands of circuit judges. For practitioners, the courts of appeals provide binding law, and until the Supreme Court speaks, a practitioner's respective court of appeals is the supreme arbiter of the law for that circuit.

Based on this, premise the Circuit Review aims to publish scholarly articles and student comments that analyze recent important developments in all areas of the law at the federal appellate level. Members of the Circuit Review are expected to write a comment that addresses a novel topic within the journal's scholarly focus, as well as participate in all facets of the publication process.

New members are chosen by the current Editorial Board upon, at the end of the first year of law school, and based on a journal write-on competition. The Editorial Board is chosen by election of the entire Circuit Review membership.

Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive credit for the Circuit Review, a student must first complete a comment for the Journal.



2

Journal

in-class

CLIN7181

Civil Litigation Clinic

The Civil Litigation Clinic handles a variety of civil cases on behalf of its clients, with a primary focus on civil rights, housing, and education cases. During the semester, students may handle all aspects of a civil case, from conducting an initial interview to trying a case or arguing a motion. Students draft complaints, answers and counterclaims; propound and respond to interrogatories and document requests; conduct and defend depositions; draft motions and memoranda of law; conduct settlement negotiations; and appear in court. The seminar is designed to ensure that students develop a common base of litigation skills through simulated exercises and will also introduce students to relevant substantive law. In addition to the seminar, students participate in weekly team meetings for the cases for which they are responsible. The clinic requires an average of fifteen hours per week in addition to the two-hour seminar. Litigation demands will vary on a weekly basis, and students must have the flexibility to commit more extended hours to meet court deadlines. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7180

Civil Litigation Clinic

The Civil Litigation Clinic handles a variety of civil cases on behalf of its clients, with a primary focus on civil rights, housing, and education cases. During the semester, students may handle all aspects of a civil case, from conducting an initial interview to trying a case or arguing a motion. Students draft complaints, answers and counterclaims; propound and respond to interrogatories and document requests; conduct and defend depositions; draft motions and memoranda of law; conduct settlement negotiations; and appear in court. The seminar is designed to ensure that students develop a common base of litigation skills through simulated exercises and will also introduce students to relevant substantive law. In addition to the seminar, students participate in weekly team meetings for the cases for which they are responsible. The clinic requires an average of fifteen hours per week in addition to the two-hour seminar. Litigation demands will vary on a weekly basis, and students must have the flexibility to commit more extended hours to meet court deadlines. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

4

Clinic

in-class

LAW6001

Civil Procedure I

This course dissects the anatomy of a civil case from complaint through pre-trial proceedings, trial and appeal. It therefore studies the organization and jurisdiction of federal and state courts, including emphasis on personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The focus is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, exploring issues of pleading, pretrial discovery and motion practice.

 



2/3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6002

Civil Procedure II

This course dissects the anatomy of a civil case from complaint through pre-trial proceedings, trial and appeal. It therefore studies the organization and jurisdiction of federal and state courts, including emphasis on personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The focus is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, exploring issues of pleading, pretrial discovery and motion practice.



2/3

Lecture

in-class

PUBR7909

Civil Rights Law

This course provides the student with an introduction to constitutional litigation, civil rights policy, and statutory enforcement of civil rights. To that end, emphasis will be placed on gaining a thorough understanding of post-Civil War constitutional amendments and federal civil rights legislation, particularly Section 1983. The course will also investigate some aspects of structural reform litigation, with an emphasis on school desegregation. Intended for students with a strong interest in any or all of the following: constitutional law, civil rights, federal courts, federal/state relations and race relations.



Prerequisites: Constitutional Law or Constitutional Law I & II

3

Lecture

in-class

COML7121

Commercial Law Survey

This important course is a survey of Articles 2, 9 and 3 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It affords students the opportunity to develop enhanced familiarity with the laws of sales and consumer transactions, and then the law of secured financing, which involves the voluntary collateralization of goods.  The course then examines related aspects of consumer and commercial bankruptcy law. It concludes with an overview of the law of negotiable instruments, also known as commercial paper.  Negotiable instruments are promissory notes and checks.  The course explores the predicates to proper transfer of negotiable instruments, the elements and benefits of holder in due course status, and liability for lost, stolen or forged checks.



Prerequisites: Contracts I and II.

3

Lecture

in-class

INTL9606

Comparative Constitutional Law

As a result of the breakup of the Soviet Union and the rapid transformation of other non-democratic regimes into democratic nation states, there has been a growing interest in comparative constitutional law. This seminar will explore the extent to which constitutional experience in the Unites States and various other countries can be shared. Specific areas likely to be examined include: judicial review, federalism, due process, and individual liberties such as freedom of speech, free exercise of religion, and freedom of the press.



Prerequisites: Constitutional Law or Constitutional Law I & II

3

Seminar

in-class

HLTH9655

Compliance Skills

This course is designed to expose students to key legal and operational concepts in the health care corporate compliance field. Students will use knowledge gained in prior mandatory coursework and participate in simulated-based projects that will require them to perform audits, investigations and reporting activities to ensure compliance with applicable federal and state laws. Through reading derived from various sources: industry articles, regulations, specific chapters of text books, government reports and materials created by content experts who will be brought in to guest lecture, students will have the opportunity to explore not only the legal facet of the compliance field but the operational reality of working as a compliance professional in the health care industry.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.

Prerequisite: Health Law

2

Skills

in-class

PRMD8206

Conflict of Laws

This course studies problems relating to transactions and relationships with multi-jurisdictional elements. It includes: common law rules and theories; underlying policies; modern approaches; constitutional limitations in national and international law; jurisdiction of courts; and the effect of foreign judgments.



3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6015

Constitutional Law

The course treats government authority under the United States Constitution. It begins with an analysis of the scope of judicial review and the development of theories of constitutional adjudication. It then treats the commerce clause and other sources of federal authority, and considers limitations on state and federal regulation of economic and property interests. It explores federalism issues of the relationship between the federal government and the states and issues of the allocation of power among the three branches of the federal government. The course also surveys the protection of the rights of the individual against state and federal government action under the United States Constitution, including freedom of speech and expression, association, religion and the right of privacy. Protections under the equal protection clause and the right to due process are explored.



5

Lecture

in-class

LAW6012

Constitutional Law I

The course treats government authority under the United States Constitution. It begins with an analysis of the scope of judicial review and the development of theories of constitutional adjudication. It then treats the commerce clause and other sources of federal authority, and considers limitations on state and federal regulation of economic and property interests. It explores federalism issues of the relationship between the federal government and the states and issues of the allocation of power among the three branches of the federal government.



2

Lecture

in-class

LAW6013

Constitutional Law II

The course surveys the protection of the rights of the individual against state and federal government action under the United States Constitution, including freedom of speech and expression, association, religion and the right of privacy. Protections under the equal protection clause and the right to due process are explored.



2

Lecture

in-class

COML7129

Construction Law

This course will provide a detailed examination of the law associated with construction, real estate development, "green building" and sustainable design; cover the relationships between the parties in the construction process; and focus on the key provisions to be included in construction contracts. It includes the perspectives of owner, architect/engineer, contractor, subcontractor, supplier, and surety in the context of private and public construction projects. In addition, the course will explore the contractual and statutory obligations and protections for contractors, subcontractors and suppliers. Finally, there will be an analysis of typical construction disputes arising from contract interpretation, change orders, delay, safety, environmental problems and payment issues; and the means by which those disputes are resolved.



2

Lecture

in-class

PUBR7904

Consumer Law

This class will provide an overview of consumer law in the United States with an emphasis on Federal and New Jersey consumer protection. The class will also focus on private actions and the "private attorney general" as well as the use of class action litigation as a vehicle for consumer protection and fraud prevention. It is frequently said that New Jersey has the strongest consumer protection laws in the nation. Moreover, because New Jersey is the corporate headquarters for many significant consumer-oriented businesses including, among others, pharmaceuticals, insurance, banking, telecommunications, and foreign automobiles manufactures. Consequently, the New Jersey courts decide some of the most important and precedent-setting consumer protection-related cases in the country.



2

Lecture

in-class

LAW6005

Contracts

The course considers the law governing consensual relationships. It analyzes the requisites of a legally-enforceable contract, including the offer-acceptance process, consideration, and requirements relating to the capacity of parties and to formalities of contract formation. Invalidating factors such as fraud, duress, mistake, and impossibility are explored. Issues of remedies are examined. Throughout the course, relevant provisions of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code regulating the sale of goods are studied.



5

Lecture

in-class

LAW6006

Contracts I

The course considers the law governing consensual relationships. It analyzes the requisites of a legally-enforceable contract, including the offer-acceptance process, consideration, and requirements relating to the capacity of parties and to formalities of contract formation. Invalidating factors such as fraud, duress, mistake, and impossibility are explored. Issues of remedies are examined. Throughout the course, relevant provisions of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code regulating the sale of goods are studied.



3

Lecture

in-class

LAW6007

Contracts II

The course considers the law governing consensual relationships. It analyzes the requisites of a legally-enforceable contract, including the offer-acceptance process, consideration, and requirements relating to the capacity of parties and to formalities of contract formation. Invalidating factors such as fraud, duress, mistake, and impossibility are explored. Issues of remedies are examined. Throughout the course, relevant provisions of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code regulating the sale of goods are studied.



3

Lecture

in-class

INDL8301

Copyright

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and doctrines of copyright law. Topics covered include:

  1. Foundational principles of copyright law

  2. Copyright in special issues, such as software, architecture, and databases

  3. Derivative works, work for hire, and joint authorship

  4. The doctrine of fair use

  5. Copyright issues raised by new technologies that facilitate copying

  6. Digital works and information technologies



3

Lecture

in-class/online

CORP8132

Corporate Finance

 This course continues the study begun in Business Associations with emphasis on the financial aspects of the publicly held corporation. It includes: problems of enterprise and securities valuation; capital structure; the issuance and acquisition of securities; security holders' rights; dividends; structural change; mergers and acquisitions.



 Prerequisite: Business Associations.

3

Lecture

in-class

TAXN7113

Corporate Taxation

This course studies the federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders, including: a detailed examination of the tax problems arising on incorporation; distributions to shareholders; redemptions of stock and liquidation; the Subchapter S corporation, and corporate reorganizations.



 Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation.

4

Lecture

in-class

LAW6014

Criminal Law

This course introduces students to the state's role in the control of deviant behavior through law. It explores theories of responsibility, punishment and reform. It considers general principles of substantive criminal law including: intent; justification and excuse; defenses; elements of particular crimes; attempt; conspiracy; and responsibility for the acts of others.



3

Lecture

in-class

PRMD9237

Crisis Negotiation

In matters of life and death, law enforcement crisis negotiators employ various skills to de-escalate tension, discern interests, and bring about value-creating resolution to conflict. Many of those same skills, traits, and behaviors are common to both the board room and the courtroom. Crisis Negotiation is an experiential role play course that explores the applicability of hostage and barricade expertise to contemporary legal practice. Drawing upon a first-of-its-kind collaboration with the Federal Bureau of Investigation Crisis Negotiation Unit, participants will acquire experience substantially similar to that afforded to law enforcement professionals. The offering will provide in-depth analysis of active listening skills and emotion labeling set within the Harvard Principled Negotiation Model. Cutting-edge scholarship and demonstrated best practices from the field will drive each session. Critical consideration of domestic and international case studies will provide the requisite understanding to translate theory into practice.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.

2

Skills

in-class

ENVR7610

Current Issues in Energy and Environmental Law

This course provides an opportunity to learn about the most pressing issues in energy and environmental law policy in the United States. The course will begin with a general overview of environmental law and policy and then focus on issues associated with access to and production of energy resources; security, reliability, and diversity of energy supply; energy technology innovation and deployment; and the environmental regulatory issues associated with energy efficiency and resource conservation.  

 

Students will have the opportunity to hear from a range of outside experts in environmental and energy law and policy from private practice, government, and public interest organizations. The course will be taught from the perspective of a practitioner actively involved in energy and environmental policy debates. The aim is to give students perspective on the future of energy in the United States from a decidedly practical perspective.

 



2

Lecture

in-class

INDL9331

Current Topics in Internet Law

This research seminar will focus on specific areas based upon individual student research topics, which may include any aspect of Internet Law, including but not limited to NSA Surveillance, Data Mining, Computer Fraud & Abuse Act, Consumer Contracts, BitCoin and other Virtual Currencies, Filtering & Site Blocking, ISP Liability for User Generated Content, Broadcast/Cable/Satellite/Internet Content Systems, and Search & Seizure of Internet Content. Classes will include overview of specific topics followed by problems and role play. 



3

Seminar

in-class

INDL7309

Cybersecurity Law

This course will examine the developing field of "Cybersecurity" law.  "Cybersecurity" refers to technological, social, and legal controls implemented by government and private entities to secure electronic communications and data networks from manipulation, theft and attack by enemies of the state, terrorists, hackers, competitors, and other adversaries.  The course will examine these issues from the perspectives of economic regulatory policy, unfair competition and trade secret law, criminal law, constitutional law and civil liberties law, and public international law.



3

Lecture

in-class

INDL8340

Cybersecurity: Computer Crimes and Personal Security

This module evaluates the nature of cyber crime and the legal framework for fighting cyber crime. We will learn about common modes of cyber attack, the use of mass crime tools such as "botnets," and the role of organized crime in cyberspace. We will study the U.S. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and related U.S. and international laws that apply to computer crimes. We will also consider threats to personal safety arising out of cyberspace, including bullying, stalking, harassment, and child pornography, and we will study the unique legal challenges involved in crafting statutes to address such conduct without unduly impinging on rights of free speech and free association.



Prerequisite: Internet Law and Governance Foundations

1

Lecture

in-class/online

INDL8341

Cybersecurity: National Security, Surveillance, and Cyber-War

This module considers the problem of cyber-terrorism, cyber-espionage, and cyber-war. The U.S. military now considers "cyber" a "fifth domain" of warfare, after land, sea, air, and space. We will consider how the laws of war and emergencies relate to cyber incidents. We will also discuss the nature of Internet surveillance of private citizens, through an in-depth review of cases and materials relating to the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Court.



Internet Law and Governance Foundations

1

Lecture

in-class/online

HLTH7514

Disability Law

This course will examine the laws protecting persons with disabilities, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Fair Housing Act, and the Fourteenth Amendment, as well as the cases interpreting these laws. We will explore the definition of “disability,” potential claims, covered entities and their defenses, and the range of remedies. Substantive areas to be covered include education, employment, housing, public accommodations, government services, and the rights of persons in institutions.



2

Lecture

in-class

PRMD8209

Dispute Resolution Processes

This course provides an introduction to the traditional forms of interpersonal and commercial conflict management: negotiation, mediation and arbitration. The class also explores lesser known and emerging hybrid processes including arb-med, early neutral evaluation, med-arb, mini trial, ombuds, online dispute resolution, private judges/juries and summary jury trial. Each method of dispute resolution is explored in a series of classes, and students are introduced to these methods through limited lecture informed by authoritative texts followed by experiential exercises. Students translate theory into practice through frequent participation in demonstrations, fishbowls and role play exercises that approximate real world legal practice. Each student receives detailed faculty and peer critique through the use of the 360-degree feedback model.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail. 

2

Skills

in-class

PRFM7009

Domestic Violence Law

This course will consider the response of the legal system to domestic violence. The focus will be an examination of the intersection of domestic violence with family and criminal law as well as the civil protective order remedy. Topics will also include domestic violence as a human rights violation, remedies for battered immigrants and tort liability for domestic violence.



2

Lecture

in-class

WRTG9144

Drafting Litigation Documents

Exercises in the creation of litigation documents consistent with sound litigation strategies, from the complaint through the settlement agreement, including answers, third-party pleadings, counterclaims, cross-claims, motions, and discovery documents. The class stresses the value of writing in "plain English" and time in each class session will be spent analyzing how to write clearly and persuasively. Students are required to write four short "brief points" and create three litigation documents.



2

Seminar

in-class

PROP7710

Elder Law

Representing clients as they age with a focus on: health care and long term care needs, Medicare and Medicaid eligibility and services; representing clients with diminished capacity and surrogate decision-making options including guardianship; end-of-life, hospice and palliative care planning; estate planning, including financial needs, long term care insurance, strategies to protect assets, protection against spouse impoverishment and support rights, and use of Medicaid qualifying trusts, family law issue in the context of elder law representation, and consumer protection law for older clients.



3

Lecture

in-class

PUBG7812

Election Law

This course examines the interaction of law and politics.  Topics covered will include the development of the right to vote, the Voting Rights Act, redistricting, the role of political parties, ballot access, election and campaign activities, recounts (including a review of the 2000 Presidential Election recount), and the regulation of money in politics, including an examination of various proposals for campaign finance reform.  This course focuses both on federal and New Jersey election and campaign finance law.  Students will receive theoretical and practical knowledge of the role that government and courts play in the political process and how that interaction affects campaigns, candidates, and officeholders.



2

Lecture

in-class

PRMD8218

Electronic Discovery

It is a fact of modern life that an enormous volume of information is created, exchanged, and stored electronically. Conventional documents originate as computer files; email, text messaging, instant messaging, and social media are taking the place of both telephone calls and postal letters; and electronically stored information (ESI) is commonplace in our personal lives and in the operation of the businesses, public entities, and private organizations. In the past decade, discovery involving word-processed documents, spreadsheets, email, and other ESI has become more routine and no longer a product of large cases involving sophisticated entities. This interactive course is designed to give students an understanding of (1) the legal landscape that has developed since the 2006 electronic discovery (eDiscovery) amendments to federal and state court rules were enacted, (2) how to manage and balance eDiscovery issues that will inevitably arise in their practice, (3) the technology behind the legal issues that arise in the eDiscovery context, and (4) how best to apply traditional legal principles to the ever-changing technologies that continue to develop and contribute meaningfully to the legal discourse on eDiscovery through bi-weekly blog posts about new developments in the law.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail. Prerequisites: Persuasion and Advocacy, Evidence or Evidence: Theory and Practice

2

Skills

in-class

LABR8103

Employment Discrimination

This course covers discrimination in employment because of race, gender, age, religion, national origin, and disability by first treating the three main theories of discrimination -- individual disparate treatment, systemic disparate treatment and systemic disparate impact. Second, special problems of discrimination, including sexual harassment, retaliation, reasonable accommodation of religious practices and disabilities and equal pay for equal work, are then studied. Third, the procedural and remedial rules of employment discrimination law are surveyed. The governing statutes include Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Equal Pay Act, 42 U.S.C. section 1981 and the Americans with Disabilities Act.



3

Lecture

in-class

LABR8106

Employment Law

 This course develops the legal theories underlying the employment relation. It covers: employment contracts; the employment-at-will doctrine and its erosion; the basics of labor/management law; and the development of alternatives to the present structure of employment law.



This course will be graded on the basis of a final exam (75%) and a series of three exercises designed to develop skills relevant to practicing in the field.

3

Lecture

in-class

INDL9312

Entertainment Contract Negotiation and Drafting

In this seminar students develop contract negotiation and contract drafting skills through mock negotiations and contract drafting. The class will include lecture, material and practical experience, negotiation deal points, and then drafting the final contract. Contracts will be negotiated in the motion picture, theatrical, music, television and publishing fields.



Prerequisite: Entertainment Law.

2

Seminar

in-class

INDL7305

Entertainment Law

This course is a general survey and analysis of substantive areas of law relating to the production, distribution and exhibition of products and services in the entertainment and media industries. Areas surveyed include music, film, television, cable, publishing, legitimate stage, the online entertainment industry and the regulation of attorneys, agents and managers. It treats the creation, ownership and regulation of entertainment speech with emphasis on the first amendment, defamation, the right of privacy, the right of publicity, copyright, trademark, unfair competition, the law of ideas, moral rights, theories of credit, contract law and sources of regulation of professionals who work in the entertainment and media industry.



3

Lecture

in-class

CLIN7192

Equal Justice Clinic

The Equal Justice Clinic handles a variety of cases addressing civil and human rights with a primary focus on ensuring disadvantaged groups equal access to justice. Through impact litigation and direct service cases, the clinic addresses immigrants’ rights, prisoners’ rights, and ethnic and gender-based discrimination. Students work closely with clinical faculty, interviewing and consulting with clients, corresponding with experts, researching and writing pleadings, and engaging in factual investigations. Through simulations and other interactive exercises, the seminar portion of the clinic focuses on the development and refinement of essential lawyering skills in the areas of client interviewing, counseling, and persuasive writing, while exploring topical issues and themes related to equality and justice. The clinic requires an average of fifteen hours per week in addition to the two-hour seminar, six hours of which must be worked as “office hours” in the Center for Social Justice. Students, who work in teams, also participate in weekly case review meetings. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

4

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7193

Equal Justice Clinic

The Equal Justice Clinic handles a variety of cases addressing civil and human rights with a primary focus on ensuring disadvantaged groups equal access to justice. Through impact litigation and direct service cases, the clinic addresses immigrants’ rights, prisoners’ rights, and ethnic and gender-based discrimination. Students work closely with clinical faculty, interviewing and consulting with clients, corresponding with experts, researching and writing pleadings, and engaging in factual investigations. Through simulations and other interactive exercises, the seminar portion of the clinic focuses on the development and refinement of essential lawyering skills in the areas of client interviewing, counseling, and persuasive writing, while exploring topical issues and themes related to equality and justice. The clinic requires an average of fifteen hours per week in addition to the two-hour seminar, six hours of which must be worked as “office hours” in the Center for Social Justice. Students, who work in teams, also participate in weekly case review meetings. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

TAXN8115

Estate Planning and Drafting

Students will focus on the lawyer in an office practice and as counselor in the family community. Development of drafting skills will be emphasized in short drafting assignments throughout the semester. The course will cover the lawyer's ethical responsibilities, planning and drafting for wealth transfers by will and the alternatives, including gifting inter vivos, and drafting for beneficiary protection and to minimize gift, estate and generation-skipping taxes.  



Prerequisites: Estates and Trusts

2

Lecture

in-class

PROP7701

Estates and Trusts

This course studies legal mechanisms for the transmission of wealth from one generation to the next. It includes: intestate succession and special problems of adopted and illegitimate children; protection of the family; wills, their execution and revocation; incorporation of unattested documents; republication and revival; will substitutes; trusts, their origin and nature; creation of trusts; transfer of beneficiaries' interests; termination of trusts; constructive and resulting trusts; charitable and honorary trusts; and policy determinants, emphasizing freedom of testation.



Prerequisites: Property or Property I and II.

4

Lecture

in-class

INTL9601

EU/BL course Travel Component

This EUBL Course Travel Component is for an additional one credit for a one week program designed to assist the students with their EUBL AWR papers. The travel component builds upon the EUBL course by affording a small group of law students the opportunity to travel to Belgium and Luxembourg during fall break (with faculty) to learn about EU institutions and various business law issues. The program will engage with educational partners at the Catholic University of Louvain, in Louvain-la-Neuve and the University of Luxembourg on a wide range of topics, including state aid, EU tax issues, EU company law, EU external relations, and tax transparency. The program will also offer students the opportunity to gain first-hand knowledge about the EU institutions through visits to the Court of Justice in Luxembourg and the European Commission and Parliament in Brussels. (The travel component of European Business Law is not a mandatory component of the European Business Law AWR seminar.)



Co-requisite: European Union Business Law Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis.

1

Lecture

in-class

MTCT7152

Eugene Gressman Moot Court Competition

Students compete in brief writing and oral argument for the opportunity to represent the law school in the National Appellate Moot Court Competition. Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis.



Prerequisite: Appellate Advocacy.

1

Writing

in-class

INTL9602

European Union Business Law Seminar

This seminar will concentrate on the basic legal rules of the common market and the constitutional structure of the European Union. The developing jurisprudence of the Court of Justice of the European Union will be analyzed with a particular focus on the free movement of persons, both the rights of workers and establishments, to be free of discriminatory tax obstacles. The seminar will also explore special topics such as company law, TTIP (proposed free trade agreement between EU and US), EU external relations, intellectual property law, and the Treaty articles on state aid. U.S. constitutional principles are compared throughout the course. There is an optional fall break one credit travel component that may be taken by the students in this course. This course fulfills the requirement of EU law and an EU paper that is necessary for application to the European Court Externship Program (Dean Acheson Stage Program).



3

Seminar

in-class

INTL7608

European Union Law

The European Union is the largest trading partner of the U.S., and the growth of multinational and integrated business activities between two continents has a substantial impact on the practice of law in this country. This course provides a basic foundation for understanding an entire legal system which has been developed in modern times. It studies the institutions and legal principles which govern this regime, some of which have been borrowed from the American experience and some which are still in the process of formulation.



3

Lecture

in-class

PRMD7201

Evidence

This course analyzes the regulation of proof in judicial proceedings. It includes: burdens of production and persuasion; judicial notice; presumptions; relevance and its counterweights; the fundamental requirements for admission of testimonial, documentary and non-testimonial evidence; the nature and function of expert testimony; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; character evidence; rules of preference; fixed rules of relevance, and rules of exclusion based on non-inferential policies. (Evidence in Practice and in Depth also satisfies the Evidence requirement).



Note: Students cannot apply both Evidence (PRMD7201) and Evidence in Practice and in Depth (PRMD7205) towards degree requirements.

3

Lecture

in-class

INDL8342

Evidence, Cyber-Compliance and Cyber-Investigations

This is a skills-based module centered on the role of the lawyer or compliance officer in mitigating an organization's cyber-risks, conducting forensic investigations in the event of data breaches or other cyber incidents, and presenting evidence in court or in other legal proceedings regarding the nature and causes of a cyber incident. Students will engage in a variety of hands-on skills exercises, such as a simulated "table top" cyber-risk assessment. 



Internet Law and Governance Foundations

1

Skills

in-class/online

PRMD7205

Evidence: Theory and Practice

This full-year course provides an alternative to the basic evidence course for those who plan to do trial work, or those who want a more complete coverage than is possible in the three credit course. A single grade will be given for the course, but it will be derived from at least two anonymous grading exercises.



NOTE 1: Students cannot apply both Evidence: Theory and Practice (PRMD7205) course and Evidence (PRMD7201) towards degree requirements.

NOTE 2: Year-long course; 3 credits Fall, 3 credits Spring

6

Lecture

in-class

PRMD9211

Expert Witnesses

This seminar explores the use and limits of expert testimony including but not limited to the testimony of scientists, social scientists, forensic experts and other less formal sources of knowledge. The law of expert testimony is expanding exponentially and thereby causing radical changes in the rules of evidence. Students will study relevant principles of evidence and the origins and basis of key areas of expert testimony. For each area of expertise, the seminar will study origins, the history of its admission, use in the courtroom, the effect of the recent changes in the rules of evidence and the point of view of both the proponent and the opponent. Each student will write a paper and give a presentation on a selected area of expertise. Some of the areas to be studied may include: Ballistics, toolmark identification, fingerprint identification, neutron activation analysis, questioned documents, spectrographic voice identification, narcoanalysis and hypnosis, odontology and DNA, and hair follicle identification.



Prerequisite: Evidence.

3

Seminar

in-class

PRMD8212

Fact Investigation and the Marshalling of Evidence

The purpose of the course would be to introduce the students to the practical problems involved in regard to the following:

1.  Determining what information to look for in a case in litigation, or under consideration for litigation (how to craft the legal theory of the case and its implications for investigation).  This part of the course concentrates on identifying the elements of the substantive law that are in play in whatever case is under consideration, and also identifying the distribution of the burden of introducing evidence in regard to those issues, in order to outline which issues require the lawyer to insure that information bearing on those issues is obtained.

2.  Determining how best to go about trying to obtain the information identified as potentially available in number 1, above, in other words, how to formulate a specific investigation plan.  This requires detailed fact analysis of the available facts.   

3.  The practical problems of carrying out the investigation plan, and how these differ in different litigation settings and role contexts (civil v. criminal; civil plaintiff v. civil defendant; prosecution v. criminal defendant.).  The interaction between resources, discovery rights (or the lack thereof), and private investigation, and the role of the lawyer in each context, will be considered.

4.  Updating and modifying the theory of the case and the investigation plan as new information is obtained.

 

Course will require written exercises  which will be graded based on students’ clarity of analysis and exposition, and improved proficiency over time.

 



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.

 

2

Skills

in-class

CLIN7183

Family Law Clinic

The Family Law Clinic provides students with the opportunity to develop practice skills and an intensive understanding of various areas of family law practice. Students serve as counsel to clients in divorce and restraining order cases from original interview through final judgment. They are supervised in their activities by the clinic's attorneys, but have primary responsibility for the conduct of the case. Students draft all pleadings and make court appearances on behalf of their clients. The clinic offers training in techniques of advocacy and in legal ethics as well as providing an important service to those who would otherwise be unable to afford legal representation. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility, Family Law, Marriage and Divorce and Persuasion and Advocacy.

NOTE: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7182

Family Law Clinic

The Family Law Clinic provides students with the opportunity to develop practice skills and an intensive understanding of various areas of family law practice. Students serve as counsel to clients in divorce and restraining order cases from original interview through final judgment. They are supervised in their activities by the clinic's attorneys, but have primary responsibility for the conduct of the case. Students draft all pleadings and make court appearances on behalf of their clients. The clinic offers training in techniques of advocacy and in legal ethics as well as providing an important service to those who would otherwise be unable to afford legal representation. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility, Family Law, Marriage and Divorce and Persuasion and Advocacy.

NOTE: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

 

4

Clinic

in-class

PRFM7001

Family Law, Marriage and Divorce

This comprehensive survey course deals with the laws of marriage, divorce, and their incidents--formation and dissolution; alimony, support and custody; jurisdiction; procedure and enforcement. The course also addresses child welfare laws and adoption.



4

Lecture

in-class

PRMD9216

Family Mediation

In this participatory course, offered in an intensive five-day format, students will examine the art of mediation in the context of family law, with a focus on divorce and parenting issues. Professor Elizabeth Vinhal will utilize her knowledge of family law and expertise in clinical education to introduce the salient aspects of family mediation including ethical best practices, the evaluative/facilitative dichotomy, gender/socio-economic power imbalances and mediator certification. Prof. Maurice Robinson will draw upon his professional mediation experiences as both a party representative and third-party neutral. He will facilitate experiential learning through the design and orchestration of student fishbowl exercises, demonstrations and role plays to elucidate the guiding principles in the field of interpersonal conflict management.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.

2

Lecture

in-class

PRMD9217

Federal Court Opinion Drafting Simulation

This seminar is designed to help students learn, through practice, how to draft judicial opinions. In order to make the course as realistic as possible, students will draft opinions dealing with motions filed in actual cases pending in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. In most law school classes, students read judicial opinions, but rarely if ever see the pleadings, motions, briefs, and affidavits that lawyers write and from which judges and their clerks work in producing judicial opinions. The availability of court records on the Public Access to Court Electronic Records (PACER) system makes it possible, as never before, for students to have access to those real-world documents. In this seminar students will be assigned motions filed in actual cases and will have to consider every document filed in the case relevant to those motions, conduct appropriate legal research, and draft opinions deciding those motions. The goal for students in the seminar, as it is for law clerks, is to draft opinions that are of sufficiently high quality that a United States District Judge could sign them.



3

Seminar

in-class

PRMD7203

Federal Courts

This course studies selected problems involving federal courts, including: the constitutional basis of federal jurisdiction; the judicial role in the separation of powers doctrine; the jurisdictions of the Supreme Court; the federal courts of appeals and the federal district courts; supplemental jurisdiction; conflicts and tensions between federal and state courts; and "Our Federalism" and other aspects of federal court abstention.



Prerequisites: Constitutional Law or Constitutional Law I and II.

3

Lecture

in-class

CRJU7404

Federal Criminal Law

This course provides an in-depth study of corporate and white-collar crimes, including: RICO; mail fraud; federal drug offenses; criminal tax enforcement; bank secrecy statutes; false statements to law enforcement agents; criminal civil rights statutes; obstruction of justice; Hobbs Act; Mann Act; securities fraud; environmental crimes; workplace death and injury; and choice between federal and state prosecutions.



Prerequisite: Criminal Law

NOTE: Students can only apply either Federal Criminal Law (CRJU7404), White Collar Defense (CRJU7402) or White Collar Prosecutions (CRJU 9421) towards degree requirements.

3

Lecture

in-class

TAXN7112

Federal Income Taxation

 This course provides a general introduction to the federal income tax, emphasizing the taxation of individuals.  Topics include the history, structure and methodology for interpreting the Internal Revenue Code, as well as fundamental concepts of tax policy.  Basic concepts explored include:  gross income; deductions; exclusions from income; credits; deferment of income; and capital gains and losses.



3

Lecture

in-class

CORP7125

Financial Concepts for Lawyers

This course will provide law students with an introduction to accounting (balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement, financial statement analysis), the time value of money (including future value, present value, and internal rate of return), financial instruments (including debt, preferred stock, and common stock), and the basics of Excel.



Pre/co-requisite: Business Associations

1

Lecture

in-class

CORP8138

Financial Institutions

This course provides an overview of the regulation of the banking and financial services industry.  The class will situate bank regulation in the broader context of other financial institutions, including investment funds, broker-dealers, and insurance firms, and in the context of other national, regional and international approaches to regulation finance. In addtion to covering U.S. banking law basics - safety and soundness, activities and affiliation restrictions, geographic limit, deposit insurance and supervision - the class will consider issues in central banking, resolving complex financial conglomerates, cross-border regulatory cooperation, institutional design for regulating finance, and financial crisis response.



Prerequisite: Business Associations

3

Lecture

in-class

PUBR7908

First Amendment, The

This course explores the rights protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution including freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and free exercise of religion, as well as the amendment's prohibition on laws respecting an establishment of religion. Particular topics may include categories of unprotected or less protected speech, regulations based on the non-communicative impact of speech, power regarding speech when the government acts in capacities other than as sovereign, special procedural protections for speech, the right not to speak, the right of expressive association, regulations of money and speech, the meaning of religion, discrimination against religion or among religions, enshrining or coercing religious beliefs, financial aid to religious institutions, and exemptions for religious observers.



Prerequisites: Constitutional Law or Constitutional Law I and II.

3

Lecture

in-class

HLTH8500

Food and Drug Law

This course provides an overview of the laws and regulations of the Food and Drug Administration that restrict the sale of unsafe, deceptive or unproven foods and drugs. The pre-market approval system governing drugs will be examined along with the debate about the length of testing. Other topics include the prescription status of drugs, consumer advertisements, and the impact of commercial speech protections. Major issues concerning food regulation are considered such as the appropriateness of a no-risk policy for carcinogens and the use of biotechnology in foods. The justification for the deregulation of dietary supplements will also be explored. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the principal regulatory means used by the agency, such as rulemaking, and court enforcement. In addition students will be able to consider the appropriateness of schemes based on disclosure and those that impose additional restrictions.



3

Lecture

in-class

INDL9328

Foundations of Intellectual Property Law and Policy

This seminar examines the foundations and policies underlying intellectual property law.  It considers how and why patent, trademark, and copyright law are similar to and different from one another, the reasons for protecting exclusive rights to intangible creations, and when the public should have unrestricted access to inventions, artistic creations, and source-indicating symbols.  The focus is on completing an AWR paper on any intellectual property topic related to patent, trademark, or copyright.



3

Seminar

in-class

INDL7325

Gaming Law

The course is a comprehensive study of the law relating to gaming activities with an emphasis on the laws, policies, and procedures that have developed through court decisions and the regulatory activities of the administrative agencies. In addition, the course will provide an overview of public policy issues, the federal role in regulation of gaming, the economics of gaming, the creation of gaming control systems, the licensing process, gaming contracts and gaming crimes. The course will also explore the nature of the eveil sought to be addressed in gaming laws and regulations, will examine the leading approaches to the regulation of gaming, and will deal with some of the current issues in gaming law.



2

Lecture

in-class

PUBR9188

Gender and the Law

This seminar examines gender-based bias in several areas of the law including: spousal abuse; rape; employment discrimination and affirmative action; marriage, divorce and child custody; privacy; and international conventions concerning discrimination. The impact of feminist jurisprudence on the study and development of law will be assessed.



Prerequisites: Constitutional Law or Constitutional Law I and II.

3

Seminar

in-class

PUBR9190

Gender, Race & the Law

 This writing seminar examines the role of gender, race, and their intersection in selected areas of the law, including employment, education, family, and criminal law.  It also explores the role of race and gender in the legal profession.  Class discussions will focus on current events and policy debates to study the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation and the role of law in remedying inequality in society.



3

Seminar

in-class

INDL7312

Genetics: Law, Policy and Bioethics

Rapid advances in genetics are having extensive effects on our life both within and outside the medical arena. This course will examine the legal transformations taking place in a broad range of legal fields to accommodate these technological innovations. Among the topics to be examined in this course are: (1) genetic testing in the clinical scenario, such as duty to warn issues; (2) Privacy and discrimination related to collection of information by insurers and employers and by the government; (3) Commercialization of genetic research, focusing on gene patents; and (4) Use of genetic information in the courtroom.



2

Lecture

in-class

HLTH8504

Health Care Finance

The financing of health care is a fundamental aspect of the U.S. health care system. Health care finance has grown and changed over the years and has become an increasingly complex and confusing mix of fragmented private and public mechanisms. The extent and rapidity of the changes that have taken place have created a number of problems which relate to such basic issues as: who provides care, where it is provided, what incentive exists, and who receives services. This course examines and explores the current issues and problems in health care finance policy and offers an in-depth study of the finance dimensions of specific topics (e.g., politics and players in health care financing: government, providers, payers and consumers; reimbursement methodologies; regulating and rate setting; ect.).



2

Lecture

in-class

HLTH7503

Health Law

This survey course introduces students to the major legal and policy issues surrounding the provision of health care. Topics include healthcare access and payment, the organization and governance of nonprofit hospitals and other health care organizations, health care fraud and abuse, antitrust issues for healthcare providers, hospital and managed care liability, confidentiality of medical information, informed consent, and medical decisions at the end of life.



Pre/co-requisite: Business Associations 

4

Lecture

in-class

HLTH7518

Health Privacy

As our health information is being digitized and stored in electronic records, this transformation poses novel challenges for the laws designed to protect the privacy and security of our personal health information. This class will provide students with a substantive overview and analysis of the laws that directly govern or have an impact on health information privacy and security in the United States. The main focus of this course will be the privacy and security provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), the foundation for federal protections of health information. Additionally, the course will examine the interplay between HIPAA and other federal and state health privacy laws and the application and enforcement of those laws in a variety of health care settings.



2/3

Lecture

in-class

HLTH7405

HealthCare Compliance Certification Program

This live course, offered over the course of four days, immerses students in the statutes, regulations and other guidance that comprise the body of law known as “fraud and abuse law.” Topics covered include:

  1. Data Privacy - HIPAA, HITECH, and others

  2. FDA approval and regulation of new drugs and devices

  3. Federal Anti-Kickback Statute

  4. Federal and State False Claims Acts

  5. Federal and State Sunshine Laws

  6. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) - including worldwide anti-corruption and enforcement

  7. Government Investigations

  8. Healthcare fraud sentencing, penalties, damages, and other considerations

  9. OIG Compliance

  10. Prescription drug and device marketing and advertising



Prerequisite/Co-requisite: Health Law Recommended: Health Care Fraud and Abuse

2

Lecture

in-class

HLTH9524

HealthCare Fraud and Corruption

This seminar introduces students first to the market triggers that cause corruption in its various forms, the harms to various economies cause by corruption, and mechanisms that address corrupt behavior.  The remainder of the course comprises a study of the health and non-health related laws that address corruption, both domestically and abroad, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and UK Bribery Act 2010; Stark, Anti-kickback and the False Claims Act; Sarbanes Oxley, Dodd-Frank and other relevant non-health laws.  Students may receive 3 credits for writing an AWR paper in the course, or 2 credits if they take an exam. 



3

Seminar

in-class/online

CLIN7190

Immigrants' Rights/International Human Rights Clinic

The Immigrants’ Rights/International Human Rights Clinic represents people from all over the world who are in need of protection from persecution, trafficking and torture. In addition to representing clients before asylum officers and in Federal Immigration Court, students may also represent clients in appeals to the Board of Immigration Appeal, the Second and Third Circuits, or the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Students may also be engaged in human rights reporting and fact-finding as well as comparative law and human rights projects. They also assist immigrant victims of domestic violence and other crimes in seeking visas to grant them legal status to remain in the United States. Another key aspect of the clinic is providing assistance to day laborers in the greater Newark area. The classroom component combines trial skills with substantive immigration law. The law clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and classroom components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

4

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7191

Immigrants' Rights/International Human Rights Clinic

The Immigrants’ Rights/International Human Rights Clinic represents people from all over the world who are in need of protection from persecution, trafficking and torture. In addition to representing clients before asylum officers and in Federal Immigration Court, students may also represent clients in appeals to the Board of Immigration Appeal, the Second and Third Circuits, or the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Students may also be engaged in human rights reporting and fact-finding as well as comparative law and human rights projects. They also assist immigrant victims of domestic violence and other crimes in seeking visas to grant them legal status to remain in the United States. Another key aspect of the clinic is providing assistance to day laborers in the greater Newark area. The classroom component combines trial skills with substantive immigration law. The law clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and classroom components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

PUBR7902

Immigration and Naturalization

This course examines the constitutional basis for regulating immigration into the United States; the history of United States immigration law and policy; grounds for admission and removal of immigrants; refugee and asylum law; the criminalization of immigration law; immigrants’ rights in the workplace and to access education and public benefits; and citizenship and naturalization. In light of the globalization of the economy and the increasing significance of immigration matters and consequences, familiarity with basic immigration law is essential for practice in areas including civil rights law; criminal law; employment and labor law; family law; and international law. In addition to lecture and working with problems, this class incorporates a practical skills component by having students engage in oral arguments; draft legislation; and observe hearings in federal immigration court.



3

Lecture

in-class

CLIN7184

Impact Litigation Clinic

Each Impact Litigation Clinic student briefs and argues an appeal in federal court over the course of a semester. The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit appoints the Impact Litigation Clinic to represent indigent, pro se litigants in federal appellate cases that raise noteworthy legal issues. Cases include a range of subject areas such as employment and housing discrimination, police brutality, and unconstitutional prison conditions. Students work closely with clinical faculty, reviewing the trial court record, preparing the appendix for appeal, consulting with the client, researching and writing the appellate briefs, and preparing for oral argument. At the end of the semester, each student argues her case before the Second Circuit. Both the clinical and classroom component of the course address the legal rules and strategic considerations involved in the appellate process; the course focuses more generally on advanced legal research, analysis and writing, and preparation for effective oral advocacy in the courtroom. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

2

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7185

Impact Litigation Clinic

Each Impact Litigation Clinic student briefs and argues an appeal in federal court over the course of a semester. The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit appoints the Impact Litigation Clinic to represent indigent, pro se litigants in federal appellate cases that raise noteworthy legal issues. Cases include a range of subject areas such as employment and housing discrimination, police brutality, and unconstitutional prison conditions. Students work closely with clinical faculty, reviewing the trial court record, preparing the appendix for appeal, consulting with the client, researching and writing the appellate briefs, and preparing for oral argument. At the end of the semester, each student argues her case before the Second Circuit. Both the clinical and classroom component of the course address the legal rules and strategic considerations involved in the appellate process; the course focuses more generally on advanced legal research, analysis and writing, and preparation for effective oral advocacy in the courtroom. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

WRTG9142

Independent Research

 

This offering consists of faculty-directed research for one semester on a topic approved by a faculty member supervising the research and by a committee of the faculty. The resulting paper must be a minimum of 40 pages and is required to meet law review student publication standards. It must be defended before the Independent Research Committee. A student seeking to enroll in Independent Research must receive the consent of a full-time faculty sponsor and the Independent Research Committee prior to enrollment. Those students interested in registering for Independent Research must obtain the appropriate form from the Registrar's Office and return it with the required signatures before being permitted to register for the course. Registration must be completed no later than the Drop/Add period of the semester in which the course is taken.

NOTE: This course can only be taken once and is not open to first year and second year evening students.



 Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 3.00 GPA and good academic standing.

2

Writing

in-class

INDL7304

Information Privacy Law

Information technology has transformed our everyday lives, but at the same time, it has profound effects on our personal privacy. A vast amount of our personal information is digitized. This includes details about our health and genes, purchasing and reading habits, chats with friends and even our physical location. Government and private companies can access, collect, store, transfer to other parties, and sometimes misuse our personal information.  U.S. law has grappled to regulate privacy through a growing amalgamation of judicial decision-making, statutes and regulations. This course will examine the regulation of privacy in the United States. But since information is not confined by national boundaries, it will also examine global privacy regulation (particularly in the European Union) and its impact on privacy regulation in the United States.



2

Lecture

in-class

COML7123

Insurance

This course considers the role of insurance in American society, emphasizing: the nature of the insurance contract, including standard clauses; the notion of wager and insurable interest; concealment; representation; contributions; warranty; illegality; waiver; estoppel; and subrogation. It examines both common law principles and state supervision and regulation of the insurance industry.



2

Lecture

in-class

INDL7301

Intellectual Property

This course will survey the basic doctrines of intellectual property (“IP”) law, including patent, trademark, and copyright law.  We will also briefly look at state law doctrines focusing on trade secrets.  The course is intended both for those who intend to practice in an IP field and for those with a more general interest in the topic.  Given the interrelations and analogies among IP rights, any specialized IP practitioner should have a working knowledge of IP areas outside his or her area of expertise.  Since most lawyers’ business models depend on the commodification of information, any practitioner would benefit from an understanding of this field.



3

Lecture

in-class

INDL8317

Intellectual Property Licensing

The seminar will provide a comprehensive study of all aspects of Intellectual Property licensing and related issues. Students will analyze and draft various trademark, copyright, character, right of publicity/privacy, merchandizing, music, software, confidentiality, patent/technology, and new media licenses, and develop related negotiation skills and litigation strategies. The focus will be practical and will show how value can be unleashed in Intellectual Property Assets through licensing.



2

Lecture

in-class

INTL8602

International Business Transactions

International business transactions are business transactions that are transactional in character. The transnational aspect typically arises from the fact that (1) the transacting parties operate in or from different national jurisdictions; (2) the transaction involves the movement of goods, services, technology or capital across national boundaries; or (3) the transaction, where it occurs between parties in one country, has legally significant extraterritorial effect in another country. The course is designed to give students a broad overview of the law - domestic, foreign and international - governing international business transactions. Students will be introduced to the contractual and regulatory issues and risks that confront private parties in a variety of transnational transactional settings, including the settlement and resolution of disputes that may arise in such transactions. The transactions that form the subject matter of the course include documentary international sales, agency and distributorship agreements, licensing, foreign direct investment, international mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, and natural resource development.



2

Lecture

in-class

INTL9615

International Criminal Law

This seminar covers the dynamic and rapidly growing field of international criminal law. Traditionally, international crimes related to universally condemned practices, such as piracy or the slave trade. However, advances in technology and communications, as well as increased transnational mobility, have led to new categories of conduct being recognized as international crimes and a new approach towards transnational justice. The seminar will focus on key topics in international criminal law, including the modern development of the law of war; the creation of war crimes tribunals from Nuremberg to the present; the emergence of a permanent International Criminal Court; and the challenges posed by transnational crimes such as terrorism and drug trafficking.



3

Seminar

in-class

ENVR7609

International Environmental Law and Policy

The course is designed to provide students with practical knowledge that will assist them in serving clients in the increasingly global marketplace. It will emphasize subjects that will be relevant not just for those focusing on environmental law, but to a broad cross-section of legal practices, including litigation, business law, securities law and trade law. In addition to general theory and policy, the course will cover: global climate change, including an analysis of the evolving international greenhouse gas regulatory regimes as well as the anticipated legislation to be enacted by the incoming administration for the regulation of greenhouse gas emissions -- regimes and legislation that are expected to affect a broad cross-section of the global economy and will impact areas of legal practice; the making of international environmental law, including treaties and customary international law principles; the global reach of US environmental laws; international trade and the environment; the role of multinational corporations in the formulation of environmental law and policy at the international level , as well as international corporate environmental standards by multinational corporations; the imposition of global environmental standards on international projects by multinational lenders (e.g. the World Bank and the IFC) and, increasingly, private lenders.



2

Lecture

in-class

INTL8600

International Law

This course is an introduction to public international law as applied between independent states and in national courts. It includes selected problems in the sources, development, authority and application of international law; the law of treaties; recognition; territory, nationality, jurisdiction and immunities; the United Nations and other international organizations; international protection of human rights; state responsibility and international claims, and aspects of the law of war.



4

Lecture

in-class

TAXN8120

International Tax Planning

This course considers the basic principles and policies governing the U.S. taxation of international transactions using a problem-oriented approach.  Students will analyze various problems from the perspective of an attorney responsible for advising American individuals and corporations earning income abroad.  Some consideration will be given to the perspective foreign interests that receive income from the U.S. sources, but the primary focus will be on outbound transactions.



Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation

2

Lecture

in-class

INDL7330

Internet Law and Governance Foundations

Internet Law and Governance Foundations. This is the required foundational course module. It asks the questions "what is cyberspace" and "what does it mean to govern in cyberspace?" We will examine questions relating to jurisdiction, enforcement, democratic control, speech, and commerce from the early days of the Internet to the present. This study raises the basic questions addressed throughout all four modules: what is the relationship between "liberty" and "security" in cyberspace?



1

Lecture

in-class/online

PRMD8215

Interviewing and Counseling

Through interactive discussion, drills, and simulation exercises, this intensive three-day course offers students a basic model for interviewing and counseling, provides the opportunity to practice the skills involved, and exposes students to the kinds of problems and ethical issues that can arise in client counseling.  Skills addressed in the interviewing segment include: active listening, question formulation, preliminary problem identification, recognizing legal and non-legal dimensions of a client’s problems, development of a chronological overview, theory development, and concluding the interview.  The counseling segment addresses the process by which, having determined what the client's legal problems are, the lawyer helps the client make decisions by clarifying the client's objectives, identifying potential strategies and solutions and their likely consequences and, when appropriate, providing advice. The final day of class will address more advanced topics such as handling language and cultural barriers, working with translators, ethical issues that may arise in counseling, and assisting difficult clients.

 

The final grade is based on evidence of student preparation; active participation in class discussions, drills, and simulations; and on quality of interviewing and counseling simulations. 



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.

1

Skills

in-class

LAW5050

Introduction to Lawyering I

The Introduction to Lawyering course is a six credit, full year, required course for all first year students.  It will introduce students to the fundamental skills employed by lawyers across various practice areas and will develop within students the habits of thoughtful, reflective, and ethical professional practice.  Students will learn the following core lawyering skills: writing, research, interviewing, fact analysis, client counseling, negotiation and oral advocacy. Through the use of simulations students will be required to step into the lawyer role, practice their skills, and make decisions that are challenging on intellectual, strategic, emotional and ethical levels.  Students will be taught how to approach legal problems by thoroughly planning, executing and then critically reflecting on the choices they make.  Faculty will provide opportunities for students to experiment with the development of their professional voices and roles, and will expose students to the deep satisfaction that can be found practicing law.  Lawyering sections will be small and students will often work collaboratively in teams on projects; thus providing a collegial intimate academic setting.



3

Skills

in-class

LAW5051

Introduction to Lawyering II

The Introduction to Lawyering course is a six credit, full year, required course for all first year students.  It will introduce students to the fundamental skills employed by lawyers across various practice areas and will develop within students the habits of thoughtful, reflective, and ethical professional practice.  Students will learn the following core lawyering skills: writing, research, interviewing, fact analysis, client counseling, negotiation and oral advocacy. Through the use of simulations students will be required to step into the lawyer role, practice their skills, and make decisions that are challenging on intellectual, strategic, emotional and ethical levels.  Students will be taught how to approach legal problems by thoroughly planning, executing and then critically reflecting on the choices they make.  Faculty will provide opportunities for students to experiment with the development of their professional voices and roles, and will expose students to the deep satisfaction that can be found practicing law.  Lawyering sections will be small and students will often work collaboratively in teams on projects; thus providing a collegial intimate academic setting.



3

Skills

in-class

HIPH7517

Islamic Jurisprudence

This course introduces the student to the history, sources and methodology of Islamic Law and Jurisprudence (The Shrari'a). The student will gain a basic familiarity with the four primary sources of the Shari'a: The Holy Qu'ran, the Sunnah (precedent) of the Prophet Muhammad, the Doctrine of Ijma' (Consensus), and Qiyas (methods of analogical reasoning used by Islamic jurists). The seminar will use a historical perspective, tracing the development of the Islamic Science of Jurisprudence (Usal-al-Figh) and the four Sunni "Schools of Law" from the time of the Prophet Muhammad (632 A.D.) down to the present day. Topics considered will include: the Opening and Closing of the Gate of Ijtihad (independent legal reasoning); the Ottoman legal reforms; ancient and modern practices of Islamic tibunals and legislatures; Islamic legal education, and the role of the legal treatise in the Islamic legal system. Consideration will also be given to topics in Shi'a Jurisprudence and other issues of contemporary interest, including freedom of expression, the status and role of women in Islam, and relations between the Islamic State and the individual.



2

Lecture

in-class

CORP8122

Issues in Compliance for Global Financial Services Companies

This course examines the history and development of the compliance function within global financial services companies. In addition, it will review the broad outline of regulations applicable as well as the respective roles of corporate governance functions (i.e. finance, internal audit, independent auditors, law, compliance, ethics departments, risk management) and their relative interactions with regulators. It will also explore the detailed interaction between business processes and compliance processes

.



Business Associations

2

Lecture

in-class

EXTN9161

Judicial Externship

Eligible Judges:

Under current faculty guidelines, students may serve their externship with:

  1. Any U.S. District Court Judge.

  2. Any U.S. Court of Appeals Judge.

  3. Any U.S. Bankruptcy Judge.

  4. Any U.S. Magistrate Judge.

  5. Any Judge of a state’s highest or appellate court.

  6. Any New Jersey Superior Court Judge assigned to the Appellate Division, the Law Division, Civil or Criminal Part, or the Chancery Division, General Equity or Family Part.

Externships for academic credit have not been approved with:

  1. New Jersey Superior Court Judges who are assigned to the Superior Court, Law Division, Special Civil Part.

  2. Trial level Judges in states other than New Jersey, unless approved by the Faculty Director.

  3. U.S. or State Administrative Law Judges

Course Requirements:During the semester in which a student registers for the judicial externship program, the student must devote a minimum of 150 hours to chambers-related duties. In addition, students must complete a minimum of 30 pages of written work product involving legal research during their externship. A mandatory class conducted by the Faculty Director, Professor Denis McLaughlin, is held at the beginning of the semester and an evaluative conference is held with the Director at the end of the semester. At the evaluative conference, the student must produce a letter from the judge verifying completion of the course requirements to the judge's satisfaction, the student's 30 pages of work product, a signed time sheet, and a completed course evaluation form. Upon satisfactory completion of the evaluative conference, a grade of pass and two credits are awarded. A student may serve a maximum of two judicial externships for credit. The second externship must be with a different judge. For additional information on the Judicial Externship Program and its requirements, please click here.

The course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis.



Prerequisites: All students seeking to enroll must have a minimum 2.33 cumulative grade point average at the time they register for the program. However, there is no minimum GPA requirement for students enrolling for the Judicial Externship Program during the semester. Judicial externs work with a judge and the judge’s law clerks on a host of research projects, write memoranda, draft opinions and observe the daily proceedings brought before the court.

NOTE: Eight credit maximum for all externships.

2

Externship

in-class

HIPH7501

Jurisprudence

This philosophy of law course will address fundamental questions including: what is law; what are the origins of law; how does law function in government and society; and how does law effect and define the individuals and groups in any society? Readings will be from primary sources: Aristotle, Plato, the Bible, St. Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Abraham Lincoln, De Tocqueville, Martin Luther King, and contemporary commentators, supplemented by legislation and selected cases.



Note: Students cannot apply both Jurisprudence (HIPH7501) and A Jurisprudence Seminar (HIPH9519) towards degree requirements.

3

Lecture

in-class

CLIN7164

Juvenile Justice Clinic

The Juvenile Justice Clinic provides students the opportunity to litigate before the Superior Court of New Jersey, Family Part. In the process, students learn about the premises underlying the juvenile system and develop specialized skills necessary for practice in that court. Students are involved in a full range of juvenile court proceedings including detention hearings, formal trials and sentencing hearings. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

2

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7165

Juvenile Justice Clinic

The Juvenile Justice Clinic provides students the opportunity to litigate before the Superior Court of New Jersey, Family Part. In the process, students learn about the premises underlying the juvenile system and develop specialized skills necessary for practice in that court. Students are involved in a full range of juvenile court proceedings including detention hearings, formal trials and sentencing hearings. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

LABR7102

Labor Law

This course analyzes the establishment, maintenance and survival of the collective bargaining relationship between union and management. It focuses on the National Labor Relations Act which, in conjunction with the Norris-La Guardia Act, governs union organizational campaigns, the process of collective bargaining, and economic tools of both sides, including strikes, lockouts, boycotts and picketing.



3

Lecture

in-class

PROP7704

Land Finance

This course studies mortgage transactions and other aspects of land financing including: financing of subdivisions, condominiums and cooperatives; commercial real estate transactions; secondary mortgages; construction financing and shopping centers; use of leases as a financing device; impact of tax law on real estate financing; financing of low and middle income housing and assistance to private financing in redevelopment; role of various receiverships; truth-in-lending; public sale of real estate securities; syndication and sale and lease-back transactions.



Prerequisites: Property or Property I and II.

3

Lecture

in-class

PUBG7802

Law and Education

This course analyzes the law governing public and private educational systems. It includes: constitutional issues and recent trends in tenure laws; seniority regulations; rights and responsibilities of parents, students, faculty; due process; search and seizure; substance abuse; Special Education; and attorney fees in school law cases.



 Note: Students cannot apply both Law and Education (PUBG7802) and Selected Topics in Law & Education (PUBG9177) towards degree requirements.

2

Lecture

in-class

HIPH9506

Law and Literature

Many great works of literature involve legal issues and by reading these works, we can learn to think about the law and our lives as lawyers more broadly and more deeply. But it is also true that as law students and lawyers we have probably acquired more knowledge and experience about law than any other subject and we can use this knowledge to better understand the works and thoughts of the greatest writers. For this course, we will read six small works: The Stranger by Camus; Antigone by Sophocles; The Apology of Socretes by Plato; The Book of Judges in the Bible; Measure for Measure by William Shakespeare; and Billy Budd by Herman Melville.  We will also read essays by Martin Heidegger and Leo Strauss concerning the relationship between literature and law in the formation of societies and cultures.



2

Seminar

in-class

HIPH9504

Law and Morality

This seminar is an introduction to ideas about the nature and function of law. Alternative conceptions of law and different schools of legal philosophy will be explored. Particular emphasis will be given to the differences between Natural Law, Legal Positivism, and Legal Realism. Some consideration will be given to the contemporary Law and Economics, Feminist and Critical Legal Studies movements. The major themes of the course are: (1) The different concepts and conceptions of the nature, function and meaning of law; (2) The relationship between legal, ethical and political theory; (3) The role of rules, principles, doctrines and standards in the adjudicatory process; and (4) The problem of discretion in legal decision making. The major goals of this course are: (1) to stimulate thought about the nature, function and ultimate justification for law; (2) to acquaint students with the fundamental questions that are at the core of the legal process; (3) to provide students with an appreciation of the value of legal theory for evaluating the merits of legal argument and legal decisions; and (4) to encourage students to expand their vision of the role of law and lawyers.



3

Seminar

in-class

PUBR9186

Law and Sexuality

This seminar/course considers a number of areas in which the law addresses human sexuality. These include privacy, fundamental liberty, the regulation of sexual practices, First Amendment rights of expression and speech, Equal Protection as applied to sexual identity, hate speech, workplace discrimination, the proper role of religion and morality in the legal regulation of sexuality, military policy towards women, gay men and lesbians, access of same-sex couples to the benefits of marriage, civil union or domestic partnership, children in non-traditional families, and gender identity issues. Readings from feminist jurisprudence and other jurisprudential traditions will supplement doctrinal readings. The seminar will cover a more limited number of areas to allow time for the preparation of AWR papers. The course will address more areas and will examine some areas in greater depth.



Note: Students cannot apply both Law and Sexuality Seminar (PUBR9186) and the course Law and Sexuality (PUBR7915) towards degree requirements.

3

Seminar

in-class

INTL9613

Law in Contemporary China

After a brief examination of the roots of China's legal tradition, this seminar will turn to China's contemporary legal system and its role in political, economic, and social developments. Topics will include: access to justice and court reform, environmental law, criminal law and procedure, commercial and corporate law, labor law, administrative law and constitutional law, the protection of human rights, and China's engagement with public international law.



3

Seminar

in-class

INDL8312

Law in the Music Industry

This course focuses on the daily legal issues facing attorneys in the music industry. It will consider the various legal relationships within a musical group and between the artist and his various representatives. It will then discuss the most heavily negotiated agreements in the music industry, beginning with demonstration, sample and producer agreements. The course will next explore legal pitfalls of production company agreements, and will then dissect various provisions of both recording and music publishing agreements. The course will then consider music industry unions and the American Federation of Musicians and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists impact of the artist and the record company. Finally, the course will discuss the legal issues facing music industry attorneys in the 21st century, with specific focus on digital transmission of music, down-loading of music over the internet and alternative methods of music delivery.



Prerequisite: Entertainment Law

2

Lecture

in-class

JRNL7146

Law Review

The quarterly Seton Hall Law Review is a nationally recognized scholarly legal journal that publishes critical and analytical articles on major legal issues by judges, scholars, public officials and practicing attorneys. Additional commentary on recent judicial decisions and developments is written by students. The Law Review is edited and managed by its student editorial board and staff. Most candidates are selected on the basis of their demonstrated writing ability. The Law Review holds a competition each summer to select new members. The participants with the ten highest competition scores are offered membership, as are the participants with the five highest GPAs. The remaining membership offers are made based on a combination of competition score and GPA.

Course is graded Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive any credits for the Law Review, a student must first complete a comment for this Journal.



1

Journal

in-class

JRNL7147

Law Review

The quarterly Seton Hall Law Review is a nationally recognized scholarly legal journal that publishes critical and analytical articles on major legal issues by judges, scholars, public officials and practicing attorneys. Additional commentary on recent judicial decisions and developments is written by students. The Law Review is edited and managed by its student editorial board and staff. Most candidates are selected on the basis of their demonstrated writing ability. The Law Review holds a competition each summer to select new members. The participants with the ten highest competition scores are offered membership, as are the participants with the five highest GPAs. The remaining membership offers are made based on a combination of competition score and GPA.

Course is graded Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive any credits for the Law Review, a student must first complete a comment for this Journal.



1

Journal

in-class

JRNL7150

Law Review

The quarterly Seton Hall Law Review is a nationally recognized scholarly legal journal that publishes critical and analytical articles on major legal issues by judges, scholars, public officials and practicing attorneys. Additional commentary on recent judicial decisions and developments is written by students. The Law Review is edited and managed by its student editorial board and staff. Most candidates are selected on the basis of their demonstrated writing ability. The Law Review holds a competition each summer to select new members. The participants with the ten highest competition scores are offered membership, as are the participants with the five highest GPAs. The remaining membership offers are made based on a combination of competition score and GPA.

Course is graded Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive any credits for the Law Review, a student must first complete a comment for this Journal.



0

Journal

in-class

JRNL7149

Law Review

The quarterly Seton Hall Law Review is a nationally recognized scholarly legal journal that publishes critical and analytical articles on major legal issues by judges, scholars, public officials and practicing attorneys. Additional commentary on recent judicial decisions and developments is written by students. The Law Review is edited and managed by its student editorial board and staff. Most candidates are selected on the basis of their demonstrated writing ability. The Law Review holds a competition each summer to select new members. The participants with the ten highest competition scores are offered membership, as are the participants with the five highest GPAs. The remaining membership offers are made based on a combination of competition score and GPA.

Course is graded Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive any credits for the Law Review, a student must first complete a comment for this Journal.



2

Journal

in-class

PRMD8222

Lawyer as Detective: Investigation and Discovery

Lawyer as Detective (letter graded) is an advanced research, factual investigation and writing course. The investigations this year will focus on Guantanamo, interrogation, torture and national security issues. The course teaches students how to sift through facts and discover underling patterns. It teaches students expository writing revealing the patterns that they have been discovered. The process of writing drafts analyzing the discoveries tests the accuracy of their discoveries and helps them understand more clearly what they have missed, what mistakes they have made and that their fact discovery often produces patterns that they did not initially understand writing tentative drafts as the research progresses is an important part of the experience. Requiring students to write tentative drafts from the very beginning ensure that the investigation will be rigorous and the writing clear, complete and accurate. Each draft, even the most preliminary, is reviewed with the professor and conferences are held individually and in small groups, to determine what further research and writing might be needed. In addition to the collegial discovery and analysis process all students complete a major writing. Usually the major pieces of writing are combined into a still larger piece the students produce more than 50 pages of writing over the course of the year including drafts, edited drafts and reflections. The course requires all students to perform 300 hours of work; have regularly scheduled weekly classes and meet frequently in collegial groups and with the professor individually. The weekly classes compare the investigative practices of other disciplines of historians, journalists, and social scientists with the standard legal experience. Students will be assigned materials from each discipline. In addition FBI investigators and military intelligence analysts will demonstrate how they investigate and analyze. The course focuses on a variety of topics that evolve, expand and contract as research, drafting and analysis requires. Reading as a challenge to discover what is not immediately obvious is an extremely useful skill and translates easily into the practice of law whether for litigation, transactions or counseling clients. Part of the excitement of the course is that no one knows beforehand what twists and turns the investigation will take and what the final result will be.



5

Skills

in-class

PRMD8200

Leadership, Ethics and Decision Making

Leadership, Ethics and Decision-Making is a two credit yearlong offering (one credit per semester) as the curricular component of the Leadership Fellows Program. The class will meet for two hours every other week over the course of the fall and spring semesters. The course will include an executive mentoring component and opportunities for experiential learning.
Students will receive a grade on a Pass/Fail basis on the completion of the two semesters, and will be evaluated on the basis of (1) several short writing assignments, (2) class participation in skills-building exercises and (3) contributions to their leadership project.

Course is graded Pass/Fail.



NOTE 1: Course does not count towards the 15 credit limit on legal practice and self-directed work study credits.

NOTE 2: Year-long course; 1 credit Fall, 1 credit Spring

2

Skills

in-class

HIPH8501

Legal Malpractice

The course is a survey of every aspect of legal malpractice form both a theoretical and practice perspective. Students will be exposed to the leading cases from different jurisdictions in the United States as well as New Jersey case law. The aim of the course is to enhance students' understanding of the connection between good ethics and good practice. Focus is on the connection between professional ethics and legal malpractice and the practical problems confronting a lawyer bringing or defending legal malpractice claims which include: the determination of the standard of care, vicarious liability, the necessity of expert witness testimony, and the scope of compensatory and punitive damages. Part of the course will be devoted to practical skills training which includes: the drafting of pleadings, notice to produce documents, taking depostions of a lawyer defendant and expert witnesses; and drafting requests for jury charges and settlement negotiations.



2

Lecture

in-class

PUBG7803

Legislation

This course analyzes the role of statutes in the American legal system, including: legislative function, policy and objectives; legislative organization; influencing legislative action; types of statutes; construction and interpretation; scope of judicial review; codification; repeal.



2

Lecture

in-class

JRNL7145

Legislative Journal

The Seton Hall Legislative Bureau is devoted to the interaction between the legal profession and the legislative process. The is bifurcated into a journal section and a staffing and projects section. The staffing and projects section essentially functions as a research resource for the New Jersey State Legislature. Members of the Bureau serve as legislative-legal interns with several legislative staffs. The work performed by these interns includes legal-legislative research and bill drafting. In addition, the Bureau undertakes special ad-hoc projects requested by legislators. The relationship between the Legislature and the Bureau is that of the traditional attorney-client relationship, in order to preserve and encourage political neutrality.

The Bureau also publishes the Seton Hall Legislative Journal, dedicated to the examination of legislation and the legislative process. Authors include lawyers, judges, law school professors, legislative experts, and students. Journal members acquire valuable skills and expertise in scholarship as well as legal writing and editing.

The Bureau also presents a symposium which annually identifies and researches a major topic of political and/or social consequence in New Jersey. A panel of prestigious speakers is assembled to discuss and debate the topic, and the Bureau publishes a symposium edition of the Legislative Journal.

Members of the Journal and Bureau staffs are chosen in the spring or summer of their first year by the current and newly-elected Editorial Boards. Selection is based on a writing competition, grades, personal interview, and prior legislative experience. The Editorial Board is chosen by election of the entire organization. Throughout the year, speakers from the Legislature, the legal profession, government, and the private sector address the members. The Journal and the Bureau come together under the guidance of a student and faculty director.

Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive any credits for the Legislative Journal, a student must first complete a student note or comment for this Journal.



2

Journal

in-class

JRNL7141

Legislative Journal

The Seton Hall Legislative Bureau is devoted to the interaction between the legal profession and the legislative process. The is bifurcated into a journal section and a staffing and projects section. The staffing and projects section essentially functions as a research resource for the New Jersey State Legislature. Members of the Bureau serve as legislative-legal interns with several legislative staffs. The work performed by these interns includes legal-legislative research and bill drafting. In addition, the Bureau undertakes special ad-hoc projects requested by legislators. The relationship between the Legislature and the Bureau is that of the traditional attorney-client relationship, in order to preserve and encourage political neutrality.

The Bureau also publishes the Seton Hall Legislative Journal, dedicated to the examination of legislation and the legislative process. Authors include lawyers, judges, law school professors, legislative experts, and students. Journal members acquire valuable skills and expertise in scholarship as well as legal writing and editing.

The Bureau also presents a symposium which annually identifies and researches a major topic of political and/or social consequence in New Jersey. A panel of prestigious speakers is assembled to discuss and debate the topic, and the Bureau publishes a symposium edition of the Legislative Journal.

Members of the Journal and Bureau staffs are chosen in the spring or summer of their first year by the current and newly-elected Editorial Boards. Selection is based on a writing competition, grades, personal interview, and prior legislative experience. The Editorial Board is chosen by election of the entire organization. Throughout the year, speakers from the Legislature, the legal profession, government, and the private sector address the members. The Journal and the Bureau come together under the guidance of a student and faculty director.

Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive any credits for the Legislative Journal, a student must first complete a student note or comment for this Journal.



0

Journal

in-class

JRNL7142

Legislative Journal

The Seton Hall Legislative Bureau is devoted to the interaction between the legal profession and the legislative process. The is bifurcated into a journal section and a staffing and projects section. The staffing and projects section essentially functions as a research resource for the New Jersey State Legislature. Members of the Bureau serve as legislative-legal interns with several legislative staffs. The work performed by these interns includes legal-legislative research and bill drafting. In addition, the Bureau undertakes special ad-hoc projects requested by legislators. The relationship between the Legislature and the Bureau is that of the traditional attorney-client relationship, in order to preserve and encourage political neutrality.

The Bureau also publishes the Seton Hall Legislative Journal, dedicated to the examination of legislation and the legislative process. Authors include lawyers, judges, law school professors, legislative experts, and students. Journal members acquire valuable skills and expertise in scholarship as well as legal writing and editing.

The Bureau also presents a symposium which annually identifies and researches a major topic of political and/or social consequence in New Jersey. A panel of prestigious speakers is assembled to discuss and debate the topic, and the Bureau publishes a symposium edition of the Legislative Journal.

Members of the Journal and Bureau staffs are chosen in the spring or summer of their first year by the current and newly-elected Editorial Boards. Selection is based on a writing competition, grades, personal interview, and prior legislative experience. The Editorial Board is chosen by election of the entire organization. Throughout the year, speakers from the Legislature, the legal profession, government, and the private sector address the members. The Journal and the Bureau come together under the guidance of a student and faculty director.

Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive any credits for the Legislative Journal, a student must first complete a student note or comment for this Journal.



1

Journal

in-class

JRNL7143

Legislative Journal

The Seton Hall Legislative Bureau is devoted to the interaction between the legal profession and the legislative process. The is bifurcated into a journal section and a staffing and projects section. The staffing and projects section essentially functions as a research resource for the New Jersey State Legislature. Members of the Bureau serve as legislative-legal interns with several legislative staffs. The work performed by these interns includes legal-legislative research and bill drafting. In addition, the Bureau undertakes special ad-hoc projects requested by legislators. The relationship between the Legislature and the Bureau is that of the traditional attorney-client relationship, in order to preserve and encourage political neutrality.

The Bureau also publishes the Seton Hall Legislative Journal, dedicated to the examination of legislation and the legislative process. Authors include lawyers, judges, law school professors, legislative experts, and students. Journal members acquire valuable skills and expertise in scholarship as well as legal writing and editing.

The Bureau also presents a symposium which annually identifies and researches a major topic of political and/or social consequence in New Jersey. A panel of prestigious speakers is assembled to discuss and debate the topic, and the Bureau publishes a symposium edition of the Legislative Journal.

Members of the Journal and Bureau staffs are chosen in the spring or summer of their first year by the current and newly-elected Editorial Boards. Selection is based on a writing competition, grades, personal interview, and prior legislative experience. The Editorial Board is chosen by election of the entire organization. Throughout the year, speakers from the Legislature, the legal profession, government, and the private sector address the members. The Journal and the Bureau come together under the guidance of a student and faculty director.

Course is graded on a Pass/D or Fail basis. To receive any credits for the Legislative Journal, a student must first complete a student note or comment for this Journal.



1

Journal

in-class

HLTH8508

Medical Malpractice

This course focuses on traditional principles underlying New Jersey medical malpractice law, using a practical and substantive approach to the subjection, focusing on the standard of care, expert-related issues, causation and damages relating or pertaining to medical malpractice actions. The school attendance will be in effect for this course, and class participation is expected.



2

Lecture

in-class

HLTH7511

Mental Health Law

Most basically, this course focuses on the way law treats those who are deemed mentally disordered. This "special treatment" will be explored in both the criminal and civil contexts. In the criminal context, core topics such as the insanity defense, mens rea, and criminal sentencing will be deeply explored. In the civil context, the course focuses on the use of governmental authority to restrict or deprive individuals with a mental disorder of liberty or property by seeking to prevent future harm to self or others. The rules governing expert testimony, the right to refuse psychiatric medication, and competency determinations will also be examined. To provide a foundation for the legal analysis, the nature and treatment of mental disorders will be summarily explored.



2

Lecture

in-class

CORP8135

Mergers and Acquisitions

This course examines the Board and Shareholder actions that may be required in connection with corporate mergers, acquisitions and divestitures, as well as stock and asset purchase arrangements. The course will cover the mechanics of combination transactions from preliminary agreement to consummation, including letter of intent, due diligence, and acquisition and divestiture documents, with special emphasis on key strategic and legal issues common to the diligence, negotiation and drafting processes, including securities disclosure obligations. In addition, the class will study poison pill initiatives and other defense mechanisms used to thwart unwanted takeover attempts, including current issues in corporate governance and shareholder perspectives. The class will consider the Board's role in these transactions, as well as the Shareholder role in, among others, going private transactions. We will link transactional law matters with securities law compliance and corporate governance.



Prerequisite: Business Associations

2

Lecture

in-class

PUBG7805

National Security Law

The course will begin with an overview of the constitutional separation of national security powers, especially as between the branches of the federal government.  The course will then focus on individual topics to provide an overview of the field.  For example, the class will address issues surrounding preventive detention, military commissions, rendition, secrecy and classified information, government surveillance, and criminal law questions arising out of the "war on terrorism."



2

Lecture

in-class

PRMD9236

Negotiation Skills in Criminal Litigation

According to recent United States Department of Justice data, nearly 97% of federal criminal prosecutions are resolved without recourse to trial. The plea bargaining process is essential to the timely disposition of those matters. The Professor will instruct this first-of-its-kind offering at Seton Hall Law. Set against the Harvard Principled Negotiation Method, the Professor will examine the most salient moments in a criminal case. These include, pre-indictment advocacy, examination of the grand jury process, review of the federal indictment and the federal information as accusatory instruments, use of cooperation agreements and 5k1.1 letters, the affirmative use of media, consideration of how jury election impacts negotiation and the operative dynamic between the prosecution and defense counsel throughout the plea bargaining process. Students are advised that this 2-credit Legal Practice Curriculum offering will require participation in a six-hour "super session" to be held on a weekend. The exercise will afford participants the opportunity to engage in role plays which approximate practice-based scenarios. The super session will truncate the semester by 3 calendar weeks.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail. Note: Students can only apply either Negotiation Skills in Civil Litigation (PRMD9234), Negotiation Skills in Transactional Lawyering (PRMD9233) and Advanced Negotiation Skills (PRMD9226) towards degree requirements.

2

Skills

in-class

PUBR9170

New Jersey Constitutional Law

This AWR-only seminar analyzes the New Jersey Constitution with an emphasis on the ways in which it differs from the United States Constitution. As one might expect, the seminar will explore instances in which language in the New Jersey Constitution is interpreted by the Supreme Court of New Jersey differently than the same or similar language in the United States Constitution is interpreted by the Supreme Court of the United States. But it will also study provisions of the New Jersey Constitution that differ from or have no counterpart in the United States Constitution. Perhaps most fundamentally, the seminar will consider the ways in which the purpose, function, and structure of the New Jersey Constitution contrast with the purpose, function, and structure of the United States Constitution.   The materials to be studied—in addition to the texts of the two constitutions—will primarily be opinions of the Supreme Court of New Jersey.



3

Seminar

in-class

ENVR8603

New Jersey Environmental Law

This course studies common law and statutory law in New Jersey regarding environmental protection. Special emphasis is given to water and air pollution, solid waste, noise and toxic substances. Problems of administrative and intergovernmental relations are discussed and preventive as well as remedial aspects are considered.



Recommended: Environmental Law or Hazardous Waste.

2

Lecture

in-class

PROP9709

New Jersey Land Use Practice

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the world of practice before municipal land use planning and zoning boards. The class will briefly review the history and state authorization of land use regulation. Procedural requirements of the practice and jurisdictional pitfalls especially in the areas of the requirements for public notices of meeting, filings and conflict-required recusal of board members will be extensively covered. A substantial portion of the course will be devoted to the nuts and bolts of presenting matters to boards and will deal with such practical topics as: how to determine which is the legally appropriate board to approach; how to obtain (or convince a board to deny) the required relief (subdivision and site plan approvals, bulk variances or use and other (variances); how to prepare a case for presentation including the required legal proofs, and political, timing and related considerations; how to mount effective opposition to an application; and how and when to appeal from an adverse decision. Extensive class participation is expected and students will hear from outside planning, traffic and engineering experts. The grade will be based on writing assignments and class performance.



Prerequisites: Property or Property I and II

2

Seminar

in-class

PRMD8202

New Jersey Practice

This course is an expanded state court counterpart to the first year Civil Procedure Course, and provides a detailed examination of the rules of litigation, practice and procedure for the New Jersey state courts. Primary emphasis is placed upon the court rules and applicable case law governing civil litigation practice before the New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division, Law Division, Civil and Special Civil Part, and Chancery Division, General Equity and Family Part. The rules of the Superior Court, Law Division, Criminal Part and the N.J. Municipal Courts are also covered. Since rules of practice and procedure vary widely from state to state, this course is especially valuable for a student contemplating practice in New Jersey.



3

Lecture

in-class

INDL8350

New Media Law



1

Lecture

in-class/online

PRMD8203

New York Practice

New York Practice and rules differ significantly from federal practice as studied in Civil Procedure I and II. This course focuses on those differences, including: New York's Long Arm Statute; its complex timeliness doctrines; its distinctive motion practice; its unique court structure; and standards for preliminary relief. A student planning to practice in New York is well advised to take this course.



3

Lecture

in-class

PRMD9240

NITA Deposition Skills Program

This course provides a strong framework for basic techniques of taking depositions, and explores a variety of questioning methods. The result is that witnesses are encouraged to give expansive, exhaustive answers -- including other potential sources of information -- and that other potential avenues of escape are closed off. Students also learn to theory-test on subjects of importance to the case. Students receive supportive, helpful suggestions on how to improve performance, utilizing frequent repetitions in the learning-by-doing method to help master new techniques. A portion of the program is also devoted to ethical considerations in deposition settings and witness preparation.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail. Prerequisites: Persuasion and Advocacy, Evidence or Evidence: Theory and Practice

 

1

Skills

in-class

INDL9310

Patent Application, Preparation and Prosecution

This seminar develops the writing and analytical skills required to draft applications for United States patents. Patent claim drafting skills are not undertaken in this course. Patent prosecution techniques, however, including evaluation of Patent and Trademark Office Official Actions and preparation of responses to these Official Actions are studied. There also is practice in drafting appellate briefs for submission to the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences.



Prerequisite: Patent Law and Practice.

NOTE: Students are required to have a degree in engineering or a physical science.

2

Seminar

in-class

INDL9305

Patent Claim Drafting

This drafting seminar will focus on the "claim" or "claims" appended to a patent specification. The claim defines the scope of the grant, or the technical extent of the exclusive privilege the patent accords to its owner. Claim drafting assignments will be distributed to the students before each class. Each student's work will be reviewed on an individual basis, with rewriting and revision as needed.



Prerequisite: Patent Law and Practice.

NOTE: Students are required to have a degree in engineering or a physical science.

2

Seminar

in-class

INDL8303

Patent Law

This course undertakes an intensive examination of the nature of patents and questions of patent validity and procurement, primarily for those intending to specialize in the patent area in their future practice. It includes: nature of patent property; problems in the procurement of patents including filing date, obtention and maintenance; international practice and problems; patent office practice; problems of validity including novelty, utility and non-obviousness; and transfers of property rights in patents.



3

Lecture

in-class

LABR8105

Pension and Profit Sharing Plans

This course studies: tax qualified and non-qualified employee benefits in the context of ERISA; forms of employee benefits plans, their administration and termination; and the enforcement of participants' rights. The course also addresses planning aspects of deferred compensation.



2

Lecture

in-class

PRMD8210

Persuasion and Advocacy

In this highly participatory course, students will learn the art of persuasion in the context of the courtroom. Exercises and simulations will focus on the integration of storytelling and thematic development into the basic skills of direct examination, cross-examination, opening statements and closing arguments. By the end of the course students should be more able to argue and more likely to win - whether inside or outside the courtroom.

Course is graded High Pass, Pass/D or Fail.



2

Skills

in-class

HIPH7504

Professional Responsibility

This course is an introduction to the rules governing the lawyering process. It examines the legally imposed and conscience-imposed duties of members of the legal profession to clients, witnesses, opposing parties, governmental agencies and the public. It explores the economics of the legal profession and includes a detailed examination of the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility and other related standards of proper conduct. Students planning to sit for the New Jersey Bar Examination must achieve a grade of "C" or better in the Professional Responsibility course as partial fulfillment of the requirements for application for admission to practice law. Students who receive a "C-", "D" or "D+" must sit for the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) to be admitted to the New Jersey Bar.



NOTE: Students should consult with the Board of Bar Examiners in the jurisdiction where they intend to seek admission to the bar as to whether that jurisdiction requires sitting for the MPRE.

2

Lecture

in-class

LAW6016

Property

This course undertakes a basic survey of the concepts of possession and ownership of land, chattels and other forms of property. It includes the history, legal status and modes of transfer of real and personal property; estates in land -- an introduction to future interests; forms of ownership and title; the transfer of interests in land including landlord/tenant; condemnation; restrictive covenants; and equitable servitude.



5

Lecture

in-class

LAW6010

Property I

This course undertakes a basic survey of the concepts of possession and ownership of land, chattels and other forms of property. It includes the history, legal status and modes of transfer of real and personal property; estates in land -- an introduction to future interests; forms of ownership and title; the transfer of interests in land including landlord/tenant; condemnation; restrictive covenants; and equitable servitude.



2

Lecture

in-class

LAW6011

Property II

This course undertakes a basic survey of the concepts of possession and ownership of land, chattels and other forms of property. It includes the history, legal status and modes of transfer of real and personal property; estates in land -- an introduction to future interests; forms of ownership and title; the transfer of interests in land including landlord/tenant; condemnation; restrictive covenants; and equitable servitude.



2

Lecture

in-class

HLTH9515

Public Health Law

This seminar examines the use of governmental authority to identify, prevent, and respond to health risks at the population level. Topics include policies related to vaccines and antibiotics, legal responses to infectious disease outbreaks, public health surveillance and screening, and the role of law in controlling unhealthy behaviors such as smoking or eating unhealthy food.



Prerequisite: Constitutional Law, or Constitutional Law I and Constitutional Law II

3

Seminar

in-class

HLTH7520

Regulating Research with Human Subjects

This seminar explores regulatory, ethical, and compliance issues that arise for individuals and entities involved in all aspects of research involving human participants, including sponsors, researchers, research institutions, contract research organizations and institutional review boards (IRBs). Topics covered include risk-benefit assessment, informed consent, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, research with vulnerable populations, and international research.



3

Seminar

in-class

PUBR9174

Religion and the First Amendment

The seminar studies opinions construing the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment, with particular emphasis on recent church-state cases. Areas of discussion will include government regulatory and adjudicative powers over religious institutions and persons, religious pluralism, and religious expression in public and political forums.



Prerequisites: Constitutional Law or Constitutional Law I and II.

3

Seminar

in-class

PRMD8201

Remedies

This course undertakes a detailed examination of the substantive law of civil remedies. It considers restitution, damages and the forms of equitable relief, as well as preconditions for the award of specific remedies, measure of recovery and shaping the award.



3

Lecture

in-class

PRMD9235

SDNY Representative in Mediation Practicum

Through an innovative partnership with the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (“SDNY”), students in this course will represent federal litigants for the limited purpose of representation in court-annexed mediation. Enrollment is restricted to third and fourth year students. Under faculty supervision, students will participate in all material aspects of the attorney-client relationship, including the intake meeting, assessing client interests, negotiating with opposing counsel, drafting a pre-mediation statement and advocating for the client in a mediation to be conducted in Manhattan. The instructor will bifurcate the semester into two components: the study of mediation and the practicum phase. During the initial 5 classes, students will come to understand the nature of federal court-annexed mediation, the various mediator styles and effective client counseling techniques. The Newark Office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) will conduct a workshop on employment discrimination, the cause of action that plaintiffs most commonly assert in this practicum. The practicum phase will be largely devoted to individualized instruction and interaction with clients and opposing counsel. The course will culminate in a mediation that can range from 3 to 8 hours in Manhattan. Many of those sessions will be held on Fridays between the hours of 10:00am – 5:00pm. *N.B.: Practicum classes require students to make a more substantial investment of time than would ordinarily be expected in a 2-credit elective. Under the faculty supervision of licensed attorneys, participants will conduct in-take meetings with prospective clients and liaise with opposing counsel to explore negotiated settlement. If the litigants are unable to reach an amicable resolution of their differences, then the student advocates will proceed to a court-annexed mediation to be held in Manhattan. These classes require that students be flexible about their schedule and be willing to attend meetings and proceedings that fall outside of the regular class time. Due to the additional demands of a practicum, students are strongly discouraged from taking this class concurrent with a Center for Social Justice clinic.



Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail. 

2

Skills

in-class

COML7125

Secured Transactions

Secured credit--in the form of bank lending, mortgages, and asset securitizations--is a legal solution to critical business challenges. Secured credit can help creditors lend money while minimizing the risk of loss. It can also help businesses and consumers pledge assets as collateral while retaining the right to use those assets.

This course examines the use of credit and collateral in sale and loan transactions, ranging from routine consumer purchases to complex business transactions. This course uses a problem-based approach to explore commercial deals. The course implicates both statutory interpretation and policy considerations in meeting the needs, and reconciling the interests, of the various parties to secured transactions--consumers, manufacturers, dealers, lenders, insurers, and the government. The focus is on developing situations-specific legal strategies and advising clients. There are no pre-requisites for this course, but students who have taken either Commercial Law or Bankruptcy may find the background provided by those courses helpful.



Secured credit--in the form of bank lending, mortgages, and asset securitizations--is a legal solution to critical business challenges. Secured credit can help creditors lend money while minimizing the risk of loss. It can also help businesses and consumers pledge assets as collateral while retaining the right to use those assets. This course examines the use of credit and collateral in sale and loan transactions, ranging from routine consumer purchases to complex business transactions. This course uses a problem-based approach to explore commercial deals. The course implicates both statutory interpretation and policy considerations in meeting the needs, and reconciling the interests, of the various parties to secured transactions--consumers, manufacturers, dealers, lenders, insurers, and the government. The focus is on developing situations-specific legal strategies and advising clients. There are no pre-requisites for this course, but students who have taken either Commercial Law or Bankruptcy may find the background provided by those courses helpful.

3

Lecture

in-class

CORP9133

Securities and Corporate Law: Theory and Practice

This course is designed to bridge the gap between the legal theory and practical realities of the practice of law by focusing on the various problems that arise in the daily practice of corporate and securities law. The course will include guest speakers who are prominent practicing lawyers. This course will also include field trips to the

American Stock Exchange, to a leading NASDAQ brokerage firm, and to a leading financial publication where students will have the unique experience of seeing how markets are made and reported with respect to major corporations. This course will explore problems engendered by investigations and disciplinary proceedings initiated by the Securities and Exchange Commission, the National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc., the stock exchanges and state regulatory authorities. Students will engage in "moot court" arbitrations as council for various parties. The preparation of prospectuses, proxy statements and annual reports will be addressed and students will prepare portions of these documents. Substantive areas of corporate and securities law such as the securities exchange act of 1934 section 10(b) and rule 10b-5 will be discussed. There will be writing assignments during the course of the semester.



Prerequisite: Business Associations Recommended: Securities Regulation

2

Seminar

in-class

CORP8131

Securities Regulation

This course analyzes the statutes collectively referred to as the federal securities laws with emphasis on the Securities Act of 1933. Most of the course is devoted to a consideration of defining a security, registration of securities offerings, and exemptions from registration. Liability under the 1933 Act will also be addressed, as will registration of broker-dealers.



Prerequisite: Business Associations. Note: Students cannot apply both Securities Regulation (CORP8131) and Issues in Corporate Governance and Securities Regulation (CORP9130) towards degree requirements. 

3

Lecture

in-class

INTL9604

Selected Problems in International Human Rights

This seminar will explore current issues of human rights concern and might include topics such as: The United Nations System and Protection of Human Rights, Child Soldiers and Human Rights, Women's Rights as Human Rights, Death Penalty, Genocide and International Crimes, Freedom of Speech - A Comparative Analysis, and Trafficking, among others. In addition, each student will select a country for more in-depth research on the status of Human Rights in that country. This course could fulfill the AWR requirement and no prerequisite is required.



3

Seminar

in-class

HLTH9650

Skills for Health Law Practice

This Legal Practice course connects the substantive health law that students are learning in their health law classes with the legal skills and problems that commonly arise in the practice of health law. The course uses a mixture of lecture, guest speakers, class discussion, group work, simulations, and writing exercises to explore substantive law and skills specific to three common health law practice settings: government (enforcement, legislative, or regulatory); in-house counsel at a non-profit hospital or health insurer; and patient representation (policy, advocacy, or direct services). For example, students may negotiate and draft agreements between providers and hospitals, conduct investigative inquiries using redacted medical records and other investigative materials in a professional licensing investigation, and research, draft, and promote model health legislation from an advocate's perspective.



The course is graded High Pass, Pass, D, or Fail based on attendance, class participation, preparation for simulations, and writing assignments; there will not be a final examination. To maximize synergy between classroom and real world practice experiences, students are required to secure (or to have completed) a health law externship or other similar health law placement approved by the Health Law Program by the first week of classes. Pre- or Co-requisite: Health Law.

2

Skills

in-class

HIPH7522

Slavery, Human Trafficking and the Law

The Miami Declaration of Principles on Human Trafficking (February 10, 2005) reports that 600,000 to 2,000,000 people are trafficked across international borders annually and millions more are trafficked within borders, even though slavery is now declared to be illegal in every nation on the planet. An estimated 27 million people toil under bondage-like conditions around the world. The declaration further asserts that human trafficking has become the third-largest source of profits for organized crime, generating billions of dollars in revenue each year. In spite of the illegality of trafficking and its condemnation by a broad cross-section of influential governmental and non-governmental voices, the practice seems to be exploding, raising the haunting spectre that slavery, with all its ills, will once again become an accepted part of our daily lives. This course will cause the student to ask why this is so, why it is often hidden from view, and to consider the role of the law in exposing and combating this pernicious evil. After briefly considering the historical background on the global abolition of slavery and the rise of human trafficking , the seminar will give the student a thorough introduction to the international, regional, and domestic legal rules, principles, policies, and administrative practices that are relevant to current efforts by international organizations, states, and non-governmental organizations to put an end to human trafficking. The seminar will then review a broad variety of legal sanctions, investigative techniques, and enforcement strategies used to eliminate trafficking and related crimes, focusing on why some have been successful and others have not. Particular attention will be paid to the roles that immigration policies, corporate employment practices, and prosecutorial decision-making play in this process. Finally, the course will look at current policies and proposals designed to increase the protection and successful reintegration of victims of human trafficking.



2

Lecture

in-class

PUBG7804

State and Local Government

This course explores the organization and operation of state, county and municipal government.  It considers the relation between state and local governmental bodies and the federal government; reserved powers; home rule and other conceptual frameworks; decision-making processes and allocation of authority and services; and liabilities of governmental entities and officers.



2

Lecture

in-class

TAXN7118

State and Local Taxation

This course examines the principal features of the most commonly used types of state and local taxes including property taxes, sales and use taxes, income taxes, etc. It will do so by studying the general features of the more common types of taxes used in American jurisdictions. The course will also study federal constitutional limits on state and local taxes as well as the recent decisions regarding the retroactive or non-retroactive effect of decisions invalidating a state tax on federal constitutional grounds.



Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation

2

Lecture

in-class

TAXN7115

Tax Practice and Procedure

This course includes: the statute of limitations, burden of proof and tax penalties; equitable doctrines; administrative procedures, including audits, appeals, request for rulings and technical advice; settlements; closing agreements and compromises. It undertakes an in-depth analysis of the Internal Revenue Service and the functions and responsibilities of its various divisions. It studies choice of forum in civil tax litigation, including the tax court, district court, and claims court. It surveys tax court litigation, including the statutory deficiency notice and tax court petition and other jurisdictional prerequisites; tax refund claims and litigation; the collection process, including assessment of tax, jeopardy assessment, levy and distraint, the tax lien and its priorities, restraining tax collection, the innocent spouse rules and transferee and fiduciary liability.



 Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation.

2

Lecture

in-class

TAXN8114

Taxation of Partnerships and Limited Liability Companies

This course provides an introduction to federal income taxation of partnerships and limited liability companies. It first considers the tax factors that influence choice of entity ("C" Corporation, "S" Corporation, Limited Liability Company or Partnership) and the issue of entity classification for tax purposes as a partnership or a corporation. This course then examines issues that arise in the formation, operation, and dissolution of a partnership or the limited liability company, including: tax consequences of contributions of goods and services; distributions to partners; special allocations; inside and outside basis limitations on the deductibility of losses; and sale or liquidation of partnership interests.



 Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation.

2

Lecture

in-class

CORP8215

The Law of Governance, Risk Management and Compliance

This course addresses issues of significant and growing importance in the areas of corporate governance, compliance and risk management. The course will principally focus on the risk management and compliance policies developed by or designed for corporations, but we will consider the perspectives and concerns of management, in-house and outside counsel, regulators, other relevant stakeholders who may influence governance, compliance or risk management.



Business Associations

2

Lecture

in-class

HIPH9500

Topics in Islamic Law and Jurisprudence

This seminar will explore a series of important and timely issues in Islamic Jurisprudence and Law. After offering the students a brief overview of Islamic Jurisprudence, the seminar will address several discussion topics, including Charity, Jihad, Islamic Finance, Slavery, and selected topics in Islamic Family Law. Several invited guest speakers will address the seminar and students will be responsible for preparing an approved research paper in one of the topic areas.



3

Seminar

in-class

LAW6008

Torts I

This course examines the law governing compensation for civil wrongs not arising from agreement and judicial remedies for such wrongs. It includes intentional torts and privilege defenses; negligence-elements and defenses; and strict liability, including ultra-hazardous activities, and product liability. Special emphasis is given to legal theories of causation, standards of care and issues of proof.



4

Lecture

in-class

PRFM7006

Torts II

The course will cover Defamation/Libel, Invasion of Privacy, Economic Harms (Business Torts), Nuisance, and Trespass to Chattel/Conversion.



2

Lecture

in-class

INDL8302

Trademark and Unfair Competition

This course explores common law and statutory protection of ideas, trade secrets, and trademarks. Topics covered include:

  1. Acquisition and loss of trademark rights

  2. Registration and licensing

  3. Problems of infringement, dilution, and misappropriation of trademarks

  4. Fair use and Internet use of trademarks and related remedies



3

Lecture

in-class/online

INDL9322

Trademark Registration

Federal registration provides important benefits to trademark owners, including corporations. Trademarks are among a company’s most valuable assets. Registration work is a staple of many law firm and in-house intellectual property practices. This class will cover the basics of domestic and international trademark registration practice, from selection of a mark and legal screening/clearance through opposition proceedings, registration, and beyond. Hands on, practical use of the USPTO website for filings and research will be explored. Assignments will include hands on drafting of opinion letters, registration papers, and pleadings drawn from real-world examples.



2

Seminar

in-class

PRMD9222

Transactional Skills

The transactional skills course is an exciting and practical bridge between the substantive law involved in transactions and the application of law to an actual deal. Focusing on real deals and real problems, experienced adjunct faculty conduct the course in an interactive seminar setting. Part of the course is the negotiation and the drafting of documents associated with a model transaction, such as confidentiality agreements, letters of intent, due diligence document requests, asset purchase agreements and opinions of counsel. Another part of the course focuses on special problems associated with transactions, such as restrictive covenants. Ethical issues encountered in transactional practice are discussed throughout the course. Everyone participates and professors are invaluable sources of in-depth knowledge.



Prerequisite: Business Associations and Federal Income Tax. Course is graded High Pass, Pass, Low Pass or Fail.

2

Skills

in-class

INTL7600

Transnational Law

This course will provide an introduction to the international legal system, its institutional building blocks and the participant, intermediaries and representative transactions that characterize it. The course is designed to introduce students to the sources of law in different legal systems, treaty interpretation, and methods of decision making. First year students are invited to enroll. Class readings will be organized on a module basis around contemporary legal debates. Topics include: (i) sources of international law, treaty interpretation, and the role of states in the international legal system; (ii) pluralism beyond the state: international actors and the law making process; (iii) international law in national courts: hierarchy and norm conflict; (iv) business disputes: foreign investment and the CISG in action; (v) the role of the individiual in international law, and the impact on state sovereignty. 



Note: Students who will have completed less than 15 credits at the end of the Fall semester may enroll at the discretion of the Dean of Students.

Course is graded Pass/D or Fail for all first year students; upper level students may take the course for a letter grade, unless they choose to take it Pass/D or Fail, as their one course eligible under the Pass/D or Fail Option Policy.

2

Lecture

in-class

INTL9630

Transnational Lawyering Skills: The Rule of Law in Latin America

The course builds upon Seton Hall Law’s existing Guatemala Rule of Law program in which a small group of law students travel to Guatemala during fall break (with faculty) to learn about human rights and access to justice issues. In the past, the program has engaged with partners in both the U.S. and Guatemala on a range of topics, including criminal justice reform, legal services for rural populations, right to information and government transparency, and accountability for past human rights violations. The course will expand on this program through an intensive focus on skills-building in the context of an integrated curriculum. The course will consist of weekly classes focused on developing lawyering skills through an examination of various human rights and rule of law issues in Guatemala. The students will travel to Guatemala over the Fall break, providing them with an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge through on-the-ground experience and engagement with local partners. The remainder of the semester will focus on the students’ completion of discrete projects initiated during the trip, accompanied by additional skills-focused instruction. While the specific context will be human rights and rule of law issues in Guatemala, the aim is to provide students with transferrable skills, such as interviewing techniques, cross-cultural-counseling skills, and developing and presenting legal education and training materials, that may be applied more broadly to a wide range of other areas.

Topics explored during the course will include documentation of and accountability for human rights violations; sexual trafficking and gender-based violence; the impact of U.S. immigration policy on Guatemala; and access to basic legal services. Each subject area will provide an opportunity for intensive skills-focus on interviewing techniques, legal research and writing, fact-development and investigation methods, cross cultural competency, and exposure to alternative lawyering strategies, including use of the media and public education. The teaching methods will combine doctrinal study with experiential learning exercises.

Prerequisite: Persuasion and Advocacy.



Prerequisite: Persuasion and Advocacy (waiver available if spots remain).

2

Skills

in-class

PUBG9178

United States Supreme Court, The

This seminar will study the development of the Supreme Court of the United States into an institution that, unlike a traditional court, but like a political body, sets its own agenda. In addition, it will examine closely several cases which the Supreme Court has placed on its agenda for this term.  Today, we tend to take for granted that the Supreme Court of the United States possesses the power to set its own agenda by selecting which cases to decide.  Yet for more than one hundred years, the Supreme Court has no power at all to pick and choose which cases to decide, and the current scope of this power took years to develop.  This seminar will trace how this transformation took place, the role of judges in seeking statutory changes expanding their own power, and judicial practice under the resulting statutory changes.  In addition, it examines whether this change is consistent with the classic justification for judicial review and with Hamilton's famous description of the judiciary as lacking will.  Moreover, the seminar explores how this transformation has affected substantive constitutional law, the Justices' understanding of themselves and their role, and the conception of the Supreme Court.  The class will then examine several cases which the Supreme Court has chosen to decide this term.  The class will read the briefs in these cases, as well as a bench memo prepared and presented by a member of the class.  Students will write and present either (1) a paper exploring some aspect of this transformation of the Supreme Court, such as its impact on a particular area of substantive constitutional law; or (2) a bench memo for a case in which the Supreme Court has granted certiorari but not heard argument prior to the start of the semester.  Whichever option is chosen must meet the school's standards for the Advanced Writing Requirement.



3

Seminar

in-class

PROP7707

Zoning, Planning and Land Use Policy

This course is a comprehensive study in governmental land use controls through zoning and planning. Subjects studied include: the validity of zoning and planning; zoning and planning procedures; nonconforming and conditional uses; variances; exclusionary zoning; the Fair Housing Act; regional zoning; and environmental land use controls.



Prerequisites: Property or Property I and II.

2

Lecture

in-class