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Clinics (CLIN)   

 

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Number Name Credit Type Offering

CLIN7180

Civil Litigation Clinic

The Civil Litigation Clinic handles a variety of civil cases on behalf of its clients, with a primary focus on civil rights, housing, and education cases. During the semester, students may handle all aspects of a civil case, from conducting an initial interview to trying a case or arguing a motion. Students draft complaints, answers and counterclaims; propound and respond to interrogatories and document requests; conduct and defend depositions; draft motions and memoranda of law; conduct settlement negotiations; and appear in court. The seminar is designed to ensure that students develop a common base of litigation skills through simulated exercises and will also introduce students to relevant substantive law. In addition to the seminar, students participate in weekly team meetings for the cases for which they are responsible. The clinic requires an average of fifteen hours per week in addition to the two-hour seminar. Litigation demands will vary on a weekly basis, and students must have the flexibility to commit more extended hours to meet court deadlines. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

4

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7181

Civil Litigation Clinic

The Civil Litigation Clinic handles a variety of civil cases on behalf of its clients, with a primary focus on civil rights, housing, and education cases. During the semester, students may handle all aspects of a civil case, from conducting an initial interview to trying a case or arguing a motion. Students draft complaints, answers and counterclaims; propound and respond to interrogatories and document requests; conduct and defend depositions; draft motions and memoranda of law; conduct settlement negotiations; and appear in court. The seminar is designed to ensure that students develop a common base of litigation skills through simulated exercises and will also introduce students to relevant substantive law. In addition to the seminar, students participate in weekly team meetings for the cases for which they are responsible. The clinic requires an average of fifteen hours per week in addition to the two-hour seminar. Litigation demands will vary on a weekly basis, and students must have the flexibility to commit more extended hours to meet court deadlines. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7182

Family Law Clinic

The Family Law Clinic provides students with the opportunity to develop practice skills and an intensive understanding of various areas of family law practice. Students serve as counsel to clients in divorce and restraining order cases from original interview through final judgment. They are supervised in their activities by the clinic's attorneys, but have primary responsibility for the conduct of the case. Students draft all pleadings and make court appearances on behalf of their clients. The clinic offers training in techniques of advocacy and in legal ethics as well as providing an important service to those who would otherwise be unable to afford legal representation. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility, and Persuasion and Advocacy. NOTE: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

 

4

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7183

Family Law Clinic

The Family Law Clinic provides students with the opportunity to develop practice skills and an intensive understanding of various areas of family law practice. Students serve as counsel to clients in divorce and restraining order cases from original interview through final judgment. They are supervised in their activities by the clinic's attorneys, but have primary responsibility for the conduct of the case. Students draft all pleadings and make court appearances on behalf of their clients. The clinic offers training in techniques of advocacy and in legal ethics as well as providing an important service to those who would otherwise be unable to afford legal representation. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility, and Persuasion and Advocacy. NOTE: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7184

Impact Litigation Clinic

This is a year-long course with students working towards 2 credits in the Fall semster and 2 credits in the Spring semester. 

Each Impact Litigation Clinic student works on a team that briefs and argues an appeal in federal court, or files amicus briefs in a federal appellate court or the Supreme Court of New Jersey, over the course of this year-long clinic. The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit appoints the Impact Litigation Clinic to represent indigent, pro se litigants in federal appellate cases that raise noteworthy legal issues. Cases include a range of subject areas such as immigration, employment and housing discrimination, police brutality, and unconstitutional prison conditions. Students work closely with clinical faculty, reviewing the trial court record, preparing the appendix for appeal, consulting with the client, researching and writing the appellate briefs, and preparing for oral argument. If a Second Circuit case does not settle, each team of students will argue her its case before the Second Circuit. (Teams filing amicus briefs ordinarily help prepare for and attend oral argument, but the Supreme Court of New Jersey does not permit students to argue.) Both the clinical and classroom component of the course address the legal rules and strategic considerations involved in the appellate process; the course focuses more generally on advanced legal research, analysis and writing, and preparation for effective oral advocacy in the courtroom. The clinic is open to all students who will have completed two-thirds of the credits required for graduation prior to the start of the clinic; weekend and evening students need to have considerable schedule flexibility, including the ability to attend the two weekly class sessions and to be able to schedule office hours overlapping with their teammate and professor.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

2/2

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7185

Impact Litigation Clinic

This is a year-long course with students receiving 0 credits in the Fall semester and 1 credit in the Spring semester. 

Each Impact Litigation Clinic student briefs and argues an appeal in federal court over the course of a semester. The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit appoints the Impact Litigation Clinic to represent indigent, pro se litigants in federal appellate cases that raise noteworthy legal issues. Cases include a range of subject areas such as employment and housing discrimination, police brutality, and unconstitutional prison conditions. Students work closely with clinical faculty, reviewing the trial court record, preparing the appendix for appeal, consulting with the client, researching and writing the appellate briefs, and preparing for oral argument. At the end of the semester, each student argues her case before the Second Circuit. Both the clinical and classroom component of the course address the legal rules and strategic considerations involved in the appellate process; the course focuses more generally on advanced legal research, analysis and writing, and preparation for effective oral advocacy in the courtroom. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

0/1

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7190

Immigrants' Rights/International Human Rights Clinic

The Immigrants’ Rights/International Human Rights Clinic represents people from all over the world who are in need of protection from persecution, trafficking and torture. In addition to representing clients before asylum officers and in Federal Immigration Court, students may also represent clients in appeals to the Board of Immigration Appeal, the Second and Third Circuits, or the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Students may also be engaged in human rights reporting and fact-finding as well as comparative law and human rights projects. They also assist immigrant victims of domestic violence and other crimes in seeking visas to grant them legal status to remain in the United States. Another key aspect of the clinic is providing assistance to detained immigrants in the greater Newark area. The classroom component combines trial skills with substantive immigration law. The law clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and classroom components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

4

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7191

Immigrants' Rights/International Human Rights Clinic

The Immigrants’ Rights/International Human Rights Clinic represents people from all over the world who are in need of protection from persecution, trafficking and torture. In addition to representing clients before asylum officers and in Federal Immigration Court, students may also represent clients in appeals to the Board of Immigration Appeal, the Second and Third Circuits, or the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Students may also be engaged in human rights reporting and fact-finding as well as comparative law and human rights projects. They also assist immigrant victims of domestic violence and other crimes in seeking visas to grant them legal status to remain in the United States. Another key aspect of the clinic is providing assistance to detained immigrants in the greater Newark area. The classroom component combines trial skills with substantive immigration law. The law clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and classroom components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy.

Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7192

Equal Justice Clinic

The Equal Justice Clinic handles a variety of cases addressing civil and human rights with a primary focus on ensuring disadvantaged groups equal access to justice. Through impact litigation and direct service cases, the clinic addresses immigrants’ rights, prisoners’ rights, and ethnic and gender-based discrimination. Students work closely with clinical faculty, interviewing and consulting with clients, corresponding with experts, researching and writing pleadings, and engaging in factual investigations. Through simulations and other interactive exercises, the seminar portion of the clinic focuses on the development and refinement of essential lawyering skills in the areas of client interviewing, counseling, and persuasive writing, while exploring topical issues and themes related to equality and justice. The clinic requires an average of fifteen hours per week in addition to the two-hour seminar, six hours of which must be worked as “office hours” in the Center for Social Justice. Students, who work in teams, also participate in weekly case review meetings. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

4

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7193

Equal Justice Clinic

The Equal Justice Clinic handles a variety of cases addressing civil and human rights with a primary focus on ensuring disadvantaged groups equal access to justice. Through impact litigation and direct service cases, the clinic addresses immigrants’ rights, prisoners’ rights, and ethnic and gender-based discrimination. Students work closely with clinical faculty, interviewing and consulting with clients, corresponding with experts, researching and writing pleadings, and engaging in factual investigations. Through simulations and other interactive exercises, the seminar portion of the clinic focuses on the development and refinement of essential lawyering skills in the areas of client interviewing, counseling, and persuasive writing, while exploring topical issues and themes related to equality and justice. The clinic requires an average of fifteen hours per week in addition to the two-hour seminar, six hours of which must be worked as “office hours” in the Center for Social Justice. Students, who work in teams, also participate in weekly case review meetings. The clinic is open to day and evening students who are the equivalent of a third year day student.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Prerequisites: Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA, Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Seminar

in-class

CLIN7194

Health Justice Clinic

The Health Justice Clinic provides students with the opportunity to develop practice skills and an intensive understanding of various aspects of health law. Students serve as counsel to clients seeking to put in place advance directives such as health care proxies or instruction directives, documents which are designed to ensure that the client’s wishes are carried out. Students may also counsel clients in other types of cases such as landlord-tenant actions; housing discrimination on the basis of disability, age, and health status; accessibility; and Veterans disability benefits claims and appeals.

Students are supervised in their activities by clinic faculty who are attorneys licensed to practice in New Jersey, but the students will have primary responsibility for the conduct of the case. Students draft all pleadings and make court appearances on behalf of their clients. The clinic offers training in techniques of advocacy and in legal ethics as well as providing an important service to those who would otherwise be unable to afford legal representation. The clinic is open to day and evening students who have completed at least two-thirds of the credits required to graduate.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA (2.33-2.60 with a waiver), Evidence, Professional Responsibility, Persuasion and Advocacy. NOTE: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

4

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7195

Health Justice Clinic



The Health Justice Clinic will provide students with the opportunity to develop both litigation practice skills and transactional skills, along with an intensive understanding of various aspects of health law. Students may serve as counsel providing full representation to clients in housing cases including landlord-tenant actions and evictions, as well as housing discrimination, accessibility, and housing conditions cases. Students may provide representation from original interview through final judgment. Students may also serve as advisors to clients seeking to put in place advance directives such as health care proxies or instruction directives, documents which are designed to ensure that the client’s wishes are carried out. In addition, students may provide advice, brief service, and counsel to individuals without providing full representation.

Students are supervised in their activities by clinic faculty who are attorneys licensed to practice in New Jersey, but the students will have primary responsibility for the conduct of the case. Students draft all pleadings and make court appearances on behalf of their clients. The clinic offers training in techniques of advocacy and in legal ethics as well as providing an important service to those who would otherwise be unable to afford legal representation. The clinic is open to day and evening students who have completed at least two-thirds of the credits required to graduate.

The course is letter-graded for both the clinical and class components.



Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA (2.33-2.60 with a waiver), Evidence, Professional Responsibility, Persuasion and Advocacy. NOTE: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Seminar

in-class

CLIN7196

Criminal Justice Clinic



Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA (2.33-2.60 with a waiver), Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

4

Clinic

in-class

CLIN7197

Criminal Justice Clinic

The two hour one credit seminar meets weekly for strategy sessions about clinical projects and a skills curriculum focused on transferable lawyering skills, including client interviewing, crafting effective case theories, applying ethics in practice, legal writing, factual investigation, deposition skills, and client counseling. Through a combination of skills instruction, simulations, and exercises, the seminar addresses core lawyering skills while also exposing students to topical issues of social justice with an emphasis on criminal justice reform. During the seminar, students engage in regular “case rounds” requiring each to present current issues in their cases, anticipate problems, strategize solutions, and think through the potential consequences of lawyering choices. The experience aims to develop and refine students’ lawyering skills, but most importantly to provide students with a foundation of ethical and reflective lawyering that will foster continued self-directed learning as a lawyer.



Minimum Cumulative 2.60 GPA (2.33-2.60 with a waiver), Evidence, Professional Responsibility and Persuasion and Advocacy. Note: Students cannot participate in an externship in the same semester in which they are enrolled in a clinic.

1

Seminar

in-class